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#1 L K Keerthi Basu

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 11:00 AM

Is there any way to inactive a particular color sensitive layer with special processing technique. For example Magenta layer or Green sensitive layer is inactive we will get a image of two colors of BLUE and RED. While printing cut down the whole green light and print , is it possible. Iam having doubt there and never experimented on it.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 11:04 AM

I doubt it -- I'm sure the ECN2 processing affects all layers equally and doesn't discriminate between the color layers. You could of course optically create b&w separations and then eliminate one, or do it digitally.

Of course, if you shot Kodachrome, it may be possible since the color dyes are added in processing, so one could conceivably eliminate one set of dyes.
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#3 Dominic Case

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 05:07 PM

Not in the processing.

But of course if you shoot through a magenta filter (pure magenta, passing no green light, I don't have my index with me to tell you which filter), then you would make the green-sensitive layer inactive simply by not allowing any green light to reach it. Only the red and blue elements of a coloured scene would be recorded.

A normal print of this would of course be very magenta (blacks would still be black, but whites would be magenta: however, when printing, you could also use a magenta filter to prevent any green light reaching the print emulsion (since there is no green record (magenta dye) in the image you shot). This would give a very green image, in this case with white whites and green blacks.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 09:46 PM

Not in the processing.

But of course if you shoot through a magenta filter (pure magenta, passing no green light, I don't have my index with me to tell you which filter), then you would make the green-sensitive layer inactive simply by not allowing any green light to reach it. Only the red and blue elements of a coloured scene would be recorded.

A normal print of this would of course be very magenta (blacks would still be black, but whites would be magenta: however, when printing, you could also use a magenta filter to prevent any green light reaching the print emulsion (since there is no green record (magenta dye) in the image you shot). This would give a very green image, in this case with white whites and green blacks.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I agree, the easiest way to restrict exposure of a particular layer is to use a saturated filter - a yellow filter blocks blue light, a magenta filter blocks green light, and a cyan filter blocks red light.

Here are the descriptions of the Wratten filters:

http://www.kodak.com...=0.1.4.24&lc=en
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#5 L K Keerthi Basu

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Posted 03 June 2005 - 11:53 AM

I agree, the easiest way to restrict exposure of a particular layer is to use a saturated filter - a yellow filter blocks blue light, a magenta filter blocks green light, and a cyan filter blocks red light.

Here are the descriptions of the Wratten filters:

http://www.kodak.com...=0.1.4.24&lc=en

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Thanks to all of you. since digital interemediate is more cost effective i want it to work with processing and printing methods. I need a Image like these.
[url=http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/oldcolor/technicolor3.htm]

Edited by l.k.keerthibasu, 03 June 2005 - 11:57 AM.

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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 June 2005 - 12:11 PM

You might want to read about Josh Pine's work to create a 2-color Technicolor LUT for "The Aviator":

http://www.theasc.co...rum2/page5.html
http://www.vfxtalk.c...p?threadid=3515
http://preview.milli...s_color_homage/

Something similar could be done in an optical printer by creating b&w separations and then dropping one of the three when recombining them. There was one shot (slave couple burying their dead baby) in the restored "Spartacus" where they were missing one of the three b&w seps, so they timed it to look like a cyan-ish moonlight shot.
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#7 Dominic Case

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Posted 03 June 2005 - 04:58 PM

It's easy to overlook how much you can do with separations in an optical printer. I used to get some very weird effects not just by dropping one sep when recombining, but by swapping them: ie printing the red sep through a green filter, and the green sep through a red filter. Or by printing some seps at a quite different gamma.

You can see the effects more easily now in Photoshop, but it's not new.
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