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#1 L K Keerthi Basu

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 11:27 AM

Dear Dominic,

I have read most of your books. We students what to know more about only Film Processing, It should only cover about film processing, special film processing and photochemistry. Your previous books are covered about entire post production side, it was really a very valuable book.
Please give us a book which contains entire film processing techniques , you can give us this most valuable knowledge.

L.K.Keerthibasu
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#2 Dominic Case

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 04:56 PM

Please give us a book which contains entire film processing techniques

My earlier book "Motion Picture Film Processing" (FocalPress, 1985 :blink: ) dealt more with lab techniques, rather than the wider set of post production processes in "Film Technology in Post Production". It's out of print now but maybe Amazon could find a copy.

But I think you would be better served by following the Kodak references that I'm sure John Pytlak would post (again) for you if you made this subject heading a little more open. Kodak publishes a wealth of information and explanation about film processing techniques - just roam around thier website. Sometimes you have to go digging a little, or start from one of John's links and see what else is there.

regards
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 11:35 PM

The question is WHY you students need to know THAT much about film processing. At some point, at a level deeper than what Dominic explains in his book, you'd only use that information if you were operating a processor at a lab yourself, not as a cinematographer.

Since ECN2 / FCP motion picture processing is fairly automated, it's not like I can tell them to change the percentage of "x" chemical in the developer or something unless I own the lab myself.

The only way to learn more about processing is to start reading the technical manuals for laboratory procedures and some photo-chemical engineering & chemistry books, but honestly, it would be like studying quantum physics in order to learn how to operate a video camera. It's not particularly practical knowledge even though potentially interesting to the technical minded.

It just sounds like your film school teacher is asking you students to learn WAY to much about the technology, beyond a cinematography level, and into an engineering level.

You'll find that the motion picture lab business is fairly automated, so deviations from the norm are limited and predefined due to the need to process large amounts of other peoples' footage normally in the day. So even if you understood the specific chemisty involved, it's not like you could use that knowledge. It's not like processing your own b&w still film and changing the developer to increase the contrast and sharpness.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 03 June 2005 - 05:49 AM

My earlier book "Motion Picture Film Processing" (FocalPress, 1985 :blink: ) dealt more with lab techniques, rather than the wider set of post production processes in "Film Technology in Post Production". It's out of print now but maybe Amazon could find a copy.

But I think you would be better served by following the Kodak references that I'm sure John Pytlak would post (again) for you if you made this subject heading a little more open.  Kodak publishes a wealth of information and explanation about film processing techniques - just roam around thier website. Sometimes you have to go digging a little, or start from one of John's links and see what else is there.

regards

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Remember, Kodak got started with the philosophy "You push the button, we do the rest."! :)

For those who really want to know the details:

http://www.kodak.com....1.4.11.6&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com....1.4.11.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com....1.4.11.8&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.11.10&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.11.12&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.11.22&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...ieldGuide.jhtml

http://www.kodak.com...0.1.4.9.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...0.1.4.9.6&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...ion/support/h1/

http://www.kodak.com...ion/support/h2/

http://www.kodak.com...=0.1.4.11&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...nical/tib.jhtml

http://www.redballoo...rwood/faq2.html

or http://www.cs.uu.nl/...tech/part1.html

Of course, you can make a lifetime career of even a small part of the technology that goes into making or processing film. The textbooks and technical articles fill Kodak's Research Library. Try James: "The Theory of the Photographic Process" as a start:

http://www.amazon.co...726526?v=glance

Other references:

http://www.rit.edu/~...ry/302_ref.html
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