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#1 Ronald Carrion

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 01:25 AM

If I am going to film with daylight film an indoors scene then, what kind of filter should I use? 85 or 80? Why?

In my opinion it should be 85 (orange) because in indoors there will be tungsten, so in order to level that temperature with the film I must use the orange filter. Am I right? Please help.

 


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#2 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 01:35 AM

No. Daylight film will render tungsten light warm. So if you add an 85 filter to that, the light will be doubly warm. Now if that's the look you want, great. But that's usually not the case.

If you want to balance the daylight film to a tungsten environment, you use a blue 80A filter. However, since the 80A loses 2 stops, most people would instead choose a tungsten stock in the first place to avoid this. Or simply shoot without a filter and time the warmth out in post.

*Or light with daylight sources like HMIs and Kinos instead of tungsten.
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#3 Ronald Carrion

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 01:58 AM

No. Daylight film will render tungsten light warm. So if you add an 85 filter to that, the light will be doubly warm. Now if that's the look you want, great. But that's usually not the case.

If you want to balance the daylight film to a tungsten environment, you use a blue 80A filter. However, since the 80A loses 2 stops, most people would instead choose a tungsten stock in the first place to avoid this. Or simply shoot without a filter and time the warmth out in post.

*Or light with daylight sources like HMIs and Kinos instead of tungsten.

On the other hand: 

On film you don't have a 3200K button that allows you to warm up the scene outdoors as you have with a video camera. Only the ISO of the film which in this case is daylight. So you add the CTO in the lens of the camera. When you go inside the cto plus the tungstens lights makes the light doble warm.

Is that reasoning acceptable?   


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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 09:17 AM

On the other hand: 

On film you don't have a 3200K button that allows you to warm up the scene outdoors as you have with a video camera. Only the ISO of the film which in this case is daylight. So you add the CTO in the lens of the camera. When you go inside the cto plus the tungstens lights makes the light doble warm.

Is that reasoning acceptable?   

 

The question is, exactly what kind of look are you attempting to achieve?...


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#5 Ronald Carrion

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 09:28 AM

 

The question is, exactly what kind of look are you attempting to achieve?...

This was a test question about filters that I had in college yesterday. The professor just wanted us to answer with a basic understanding of 85 and 80 filters usage in indoors and outdoors situations.  Just the basic abc for each situation. 


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#6 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 04:19 PM

On the other hand: 
On film you don't have a 3200K button that allows you to warm up the scene outdoors as you have with a video camera. Only the ISO of the film which in this case is daylight. So you add the CTO in the lens of the camera. When you go inside the cto plus the tungstens lights makes the light doble warm.
Is that reasoning acceptable?   


So many things wrong with this, I don't know where to start. I think you should ask your professor to explain it better.
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#7 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 04:26 PM

Basic is you use an 85 on TUNGSTEN FILM to render NEUTRAL COLORs under DAYLIGHT lighting and you use a 80A on DAYLIGHT film to render NEUTRAL COLORS under TUNGSTEN lighting.

 

While you could use them for a "style," they are correction filters, the 85 corrects 5600 light to 3200 light (so 3200 film reads it as "white) whereas the 80A corrects 3200 light to 5600 light (so 5600 film reads it as white).

 

They each have trade-offs and there are work arounds to both, but that is not important in the context of that question.


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#8 Ronald Carrion

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 07:14 PM

Basic is you use an 85 on TUNGSTEN FILM to render NEUTRAL COLORs under DAYLIGHT lighting and you use a 80A on DAYLIGHT film to render NEUTRAL COLORS under TUNGSTEN lighting.

 

While you could use them for a "style," they are correction filters, the 85 corrects 5600 light to 3200 light (so 3200 film reads it as "white) whereas the 80A corrects 3200 light to 5600 light (so 5600 film reads it as white).

 

They each have trade-offs and there are work arounds to both, but that is not important in the context of that question.

I got it. Thank you. 


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#9 Ronald Carrion

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 04:57 PM

So many things wrong with this, I don't know where to start. I think you should ask your professor to explain it better.

I will. Thanks for your help.


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