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Kino flo uses

Lighting Kinoflo Cinematography

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#1 Mohamed Osam

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 09:58 PM

Hello guys ! 

 

 

I'm new to cinematography and I need help about the ideal use of kino flo light ?

 

thanks in advance 

 


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#2 JB Earl

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 12:42 PM

That's a broad question.  They are semi soft sources, usually used fairly close to the subject.  What do you need to light?


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#3 Mohamed Osam

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 04:23 PM

That's a broad question.  They are semi soft sources, usually used fairly close to the subject.  What do you need to light?

I need to shoot low key scene for 2 talking with each other on moon light"will use for it arri 575 " so would like to use it as filler  ? 

and also if there's any tutorials about the kino flo uses . 


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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 03:10 AM

I mean; there are tutorials on how to plug them in I'm sure; but how to use, well, that's basically lighting. They have myriad uses, and it'll often much depend on the scene, shot, location, and time constraints at hand.
I will say personally I find Kinos also need a big of shaping off of the walls with grip equipment.

 

You also need to know which Kino-- Kino is a company, and there are quite a few fixtures these days (though generally people tend to mean 4x4s (aka 4 banks)) when they say "kinoflo."

 

In your scene; sure. Or you could do the same thing with shiny board or a white card transmitting some of the HMI back as a passive fill. Or you could switch and use the Kinos for the moonlight FX and then use negative fill in the room to kill it's transmission back to get your contrast up.

 

Or you can use 1 or 2 Kino tubes close in to the subject "fat" along with the bed to fill it in.. Or all 4 tubes tall and bakced off to fill a 4x4 frame of Opal or 251 or some diffusion. Or bounce the Kino into a white card etc etc etc...

 

It's a super broad subject, and perhaps one where a Kino may not even be the right light depending on the look you're going for and the purpose of the scene in the context of the film you're making.


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#5 Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 04:40 AM

Thank you for this thread. I, too, thought these lights had a special use.

 

I first heard about them in an interview with Darius Khondji in the American Cinematographer magazine in which he talked about Midnight in Paris and To Rome with Love. Then he mentioned them again talking about Magic in the Moonlight:

 

Didn’t you use LED lighting ?

DK : Yes, sometimes I use panels, especially when I am working with a particular American gaffer who uses them a lot. But I always feel like the result is too cosmetic… a little too perfect, like Kinos. You’ve got to play around with them and diffuse them to make the final result interesting.

 

 

That’s the second time he called them perfect, saying how you have to play with them to get interesting results. I wonder what he means by both those things: why does he think they’re perfect and how exactly does he play with them and what does he want to achieve?


Edited by Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos, 29 March 2016 - 04:40 AM.

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#6 JB Earl

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 07:12 AM

Try the 575 (HMI) from 3/4 high & behind. Place the kino flo as fill, but gel the color to be motivated from a street lamp, or table lamp etc from the setting.  Set the camera white balance to 4200K.  The color contrast will add some interest.

 

 

Another Khondji quote:

 

Too often lighting is where it "should" be.

 

 


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#7 Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 08:34 AM

Try the 575 (HMI) from 3/4 high & behind. Place the kino flo as fill, but gel the color to be motivated from a street lamp, or table lamp etc from the setting.  Set the camera white balance to 4200K.  The color contrast will add some interest.

 

 

Another Khondji quote:

 

Too often lighting is where it "should" be.

 

 

 

What does that mean?  :blink: I mean, I can see a few interpretations.

 

I forgot to add that I was wondering who this gaffer might be. I think it may be Frans Wetterings III.


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#8 JB Earl

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 09:09 AM

The HMI will simulate moonlight.  It will appear blueish with camera set to white balance at 4200K color temperature.  The kino flo will fill in the foreground and be gelled to a different color, to simulate a foreground light such as a table lamp or streetlight.

 

The exact placement of the lights will be determined by what ratios and mood you like.


Edited by JB Earl, 29 March 2016 - 09:11 AM.

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#9 Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 09:24 AM

Oh, thank you, JB! I was actually referring to the Khondji quote, but I’m glad you explained it all.


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#10 JB Earl

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 09:29 AM

The quote, hmmm.  I think he means that lighting can be too formulaic, too expected.  Maybe that's what he means by the KinoFlo being too perfect, looks just like a window, can end up fill everywhere and be dull.  Hopefully one of the lighting masters will chime in here.  David Mullen?


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