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Buying 16mm film

film stock 16mm

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#1 connor denning

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 09:55 PM

What would be a good place to buy short ends in large quantities, at a good price, perhaps locally.

Also I've some digital restoration on new super8 footage, it included sharpening, But It didn't have the artificial look I'm used to seeing with that kinda stuff. I'd like to do it with 16mm.

 

Here it is done with avisynth.

 

 

Thanks

 


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#2 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 09:58 PM

Depends on where you live. I thought Los Angeles was crack city. :shrug:
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#3 connor denning

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 10:37 PM

Depends on where you live. I thought Los Angeles was crack city. :shrug:

Oh I ment to say, Colorado.


Edited by connor denning, 29 March 2016 - 10:37 PM.

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#4 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 11:09 PM

Well, http://www.reelgoodfilm.com/ is one shop. However, their inventory changes day by day, so don't call until you actually need the stuff and are ready to buy.

May I ask if you plan on shooting negative or positive? Color or black and white?
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#5 connor denning

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 12:14 AM

Well, http://www.reelgoodfilm.com/ is one shop. However, their inventory changes day by day, so don't call until you actually need the stuff and are ready to buy.

May I ask if you plan on shooting negative or positive? Color or black and white?

I plan on shooting what ever I can do the cheapest really. Though if you could compare negative (same as reversal right?) and possitive, I will likely shot half in balk and white.


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#6 aapo lettinen

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 01:15 AM

Color negative is probably the way to go, or b/w negative because they are most likely available at reasonable prices. Color negative and color reversal are totally different film stocks and processes. Most black and white reversal films can only be developed as reversal but most black/white negative films can be developed both negative or reversal if you want. I would look for negative films anyway unless you specifically need the film only for projector use and you are not planning to scan it at all
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#7 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 10:10 AM

I plan on shooting what ever I can do the cheapest really. Though if you could compare negative (same as reversal right?) and possitive, I will likely shot half in balk and white.


Color negative is color negative and reversal is positive.
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#8 connor denning

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 05:15 PM

both are transparent developed, right? And for best quality I should develop negative as negative correct?


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#9 connor denning

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 12:34 AM

Is it feasible to make B&W film? Assume I will get the sprockets right. I referring to getting the chemical compositions right. Has anyone here ever made there own photographic film or movie film?


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#10 aapo lettinen

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 01:37 AM

I saw somewhere an example of this kind of stuff a while ago (maybe 10 years ago or so) .  Of course you can get clear film (just get perforated base material so that you don't have to mechanically engineer a feasible perforating machine) and coat it by yourself. The coating process is actually the most difficult part, not the chemical compositions. 

And the gelatin is very difficult to get to stick to the film surface so that it would not peel away when it dries. 

 

probably it will cost a lot more than buying factory made film, but can be done if you have enough time, know how and equipment


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#11 aapo lettinen

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 01:47 AM

there is someone's test setup https://www.flickr.c...57603226919391/


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#12 Heikki Repo

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 04:07 AM

Connor,

 

making film is complicated and can be expensive. It is possible, but not really for motion picture film uses. There are too many precision requiring steps.

 

If you want to achieve nice looking footage relatively cheap, just buy modern color negative film for 16mm camera and buy process+scan package for it. Processing costs money, but can be still relatively cheap (like $0.4/ft., including good quality HD telecine).

 

By going DIY route you won't get the results you asked for in the first post. Period. Manufacturing color film at home is not possible. If some sort of black and white film with its own home brew characteristics (it won't be perfect, it'll have its flaws) is enough, sure, you can dedicate years of your life to this endeavor. You'll need solid knowledge of both electronics and chemistry and you have to be comfortable with designing machines and sourcing parts for them and then building things with your own hands using different tools. In five years you might have some sort of film manufactured, then you'll have to find a way to get it slit and perforated with good enough perforations in order for it to run well in your camera and give you stable image.

 

If your passion is making films and not engineering/chemistry, I strongly suggest just buying a K3 and some film for it. Shoot it, process it, telecine it and then decide what you'll want to do next.


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#13 Heikki Repo

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 09:43 AM

Correction to the earlier message -- when I mentioned Connor's first post, I was referring to this: http://www.cinematog...=70893&p=451962


Edited by Heikki Repo, 01 April 2016 - 09:44 AM.

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#14 connor denning

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 02:08 AM

how much would I have to pay for to get 1000ft of film, it dosen't have to be in one roll, short ends are fine.


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#15 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 02:12 AM

You can't buy 1000ft rolls of 16mm, only 35mm/


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#16 connor denning

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 03:24 AM

You can't buy 1000ft rolls of 16mm, only 35mm/

 I know. I'm talking about 1000ft's worth of film, I just want to know the cost of that much film in any number of rolls.


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#17 Giray Izcan

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 04:29 AM

175 or so per 400ft, which is 11 mins. So 525 dollars is for 1200 ft of film.


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#18 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 11:29 AM

Kodak Motion Picture Catalog


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#19 connor denning

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 09:09 PM

 

175 or so per 400ft, which is 11 mins. So 525 dollars is for 1200 ft of film.

Buy short ends or expired stock is the only option.


Edited by connor denning, 03 April 2016 - 09:12 PM.

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#20 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 11:29 PM

Buy short ends or expired stock is the only option.


Stock is actually one of the cheaper things because you can get expired stock on ebay. The problem is processing and as I've mentioned before, how are people going to watch it? You can't project color negative and you clearly are looking for low-cost solutions for things, so you can't make a telecine machine yourself out of a projector without making a print first, which is costly in of itself.

Just trying to figure out your game plan.
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