Jump to content




Photo

about equipment for movies


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Swtiris Swtiriou

Swtiris Swtiriou

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:56 AM

hello guys i have a simple and a little bit stupid question but i will ask it anyway 

 what does it take to make a movie about equipment 

can you make a movie with a dslr camera and sell it like any other movie or you need to have some pro camera  

i i know about depth of field and my dslr camera canon 650d dosent have it but i can shoot my movie enyway now can i sell my moovie


  • 0




#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 6767 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:00 AM

You can shoot and sell a movie shot on pretty much anything if you make a good movie-- which generally is a compelling story, well acted, with good audio, in a style which suits the task at hand. So i'd say,  think about what kind of stories only really work on a DSLR and try to make that.


  • 0

#3 Swtiris Swtiriou

Swtiris Swtiriou

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:04 AM

You can shoot and sell a movie shot on pretty much anything if you make a good movie-- which generally is a compelling story, well acted, with good audio, in a style which suits the task at hand. So i'd say,  think about what kind of stories only really work on a DSLR and try to makehmmm

hmmm so that what you saying is i can make the movie  and go to movie festivals with it and sell it ??? and knowone can saying to me you make the movie with a camera that is not pro so go home right??


  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 6767 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:07 AM

if it's a good movie, it's a good movie. that has little to nothing to do with the camera  and everything to do with the people standing around it making the creative choices.


  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11225 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:07 AM

You can.

 

It takes a lot of skill.

 

P


  • 0

#6 Swtiris Swtiriou

Swtiris Swtiriou

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:09 AM

and the depth of field that someone told me or i have shoot my movie on 35 mm this stuff it dosent matter


  • 0

#7 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11225 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:17 AM

These are very general questions which are difficult to completely address on a forum.

 

Modern digital cinema cameras have essentially the same depth of field behaviour as 35mm film, but you should probably find a book on basic cinematography techniques which will answer all these questions.

 

P


  • 0

#8 Swtiris Swtiriou

Swtiris Swtiriou

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:21 AM

n

 

These are very general questions which are difficult to completely address on a forum.

 

Modern digital cinema cameras have essentially the same depth of field behaviour as 35mm film, but you should probably find a book on basic cinematography techniques which will answer all these questions

no man i know some stuff i get what are you saying me but the queston is can i sel the movie to film festivals or tv or anywhere else <if the movie is good enough but this is another story> and knoweone can tell me that you dont have the appropriate equipment and we can play this movie nowhere exept from the internet


  • 0

#9 Swtiris Swtiriou

Swtiris Swtiriou

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:23 AM

even is my movie on focus and 1080p but with no depth and all this stuff


  • 0

#10 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4743 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:28 AM

People buying a movie will be looking at the story, acting, the images (depth of field is just one element) and good quality sound. Movies shot on iPhones have been sold at film markets.


  • 0

#11 Swtiris Swtiriou

Swtiris Swtiriou

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:39 AM

People buying a movie will be looking at the story, acting, the images (depth of field is just one element) and good quality sound. Movies shot on iPhones have been sold at film marketso

so if i go to film festivals with my movie they cant reject me


  • 0

#12 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 6767 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:43 AM

They can always reject you no matter what camera you use for many reasons-- but no, on a format side, they don't tent to care if it's a good film which suits their specific programming .


  • 0

#13 Jimmy Jib

Jimmy Jib
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • Other
  • Australia

Posted 30 March 2016 - 11:08 AM

To me, the DSLR look is kind of "artificial" whereas the look of a proper cinema camera is more "organic" and beautiful. You want your story to get noticed? You want it to look great? Use a proper cinema camera, with real cinema lenses if you can. It's hard enough to make a movie even using real production gear...


  • 0

#14 Landon D. Parks

Landon D. Parks
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1627 posts
  • Producer
  • Cincinnati, Ohio

Posted 30 March 2016 - 02:13 PM

To me, the DSLR look is kind of "artificial" whereas the look of a proper cinema camera is more "organic" and beautiful. You want your story to get noticed? You want it to look great? Use a proper cinema camera, with real cinema lenses if you can. It's hard enough to make a movie even using real production gear...

 

This is just not really the case. That is one of the reasons why so many small budget movies suck - or never get made at all. Filmmakers think they need top of the line grip equipment and $100,000 cinema cameras to pull off a nice looking movie. This either results in most of the budget being spent on overpriced equipment, or possibly good films never getting made because one cannot afford the daily rental for a Red.

No. In terms of cameras, all sorts of camera's have been used in the past. Star Wars 2 and 3 were shot on a 2/3" camcorder at 4:2:2 (as were quite a few other films during that camera's era), and camera's like that are far inferior to today's DSLR's for the most part, at least in terms of image quality. DSLR's have roughly the same size sensor as the bigger cinema camera's, and the lenses from the cinema camera's will adapt to a DSLR if you really want to go that route. DSLR's do suffer in dynamic range areas, but in reality most people make this out to be more than it is. As long as you're careful to exposure correctly, you'll not have any glaring issues.

 

To top this off, when people go to the cinema to a movie - they are seeing a project that has been heavily modified and graded, and even if these DR issues exist, 99.9% of the audience will not know it, because most people have no idea what dynamic range is, let alone how to see it. The only people who might notice are other pixel-peeping filmmakers, but then if you're making a movie only for their happiness please wait til you can afford to buy a few Red's before you make that film. 

 

I can tell you, a GH4 for $1,000 - combined with the Vlog update and a Ninja Assassin will produce very nice images that are perfectly capable of most movies. On top of that, people need to stop putting so much stock in the camera alone - another reason why indie films suck most of the time. Rather than investing money in production value, professional sound, etc. - they invest in 'cinema cameras', which really don't produce much different image quality than a DSLR, and the movie suffers.

In my opinion, professional equipment from big name manufacturers; and camera's like Epic's and Alexa's fit perfectly into a professional production pipeline - where their resilience will last a long time on many different productions, and the camera's and equipment will match up to other professional items present on a 'real' film set.

 

If you're making a movie on your own, you can buy the ProAM 8' jib for $300 and save yourself thousands over one of the 'name brand' jibs, and it'll produce the same final image. 


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 30 March 2016 - 02:17 PM.

  • 0

#15 Landon D. Parks

Landon D. Parks
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1627 posts
  • Producer
  • Cincinnati, Ohio

Posted 30 March 2016 - 02:19 PM

As for the original poster's question, it's a little unclear. It sounds like he want's to make a movie ABOUT equipment, but that might just be a language issue. Poster, if you're asking about equipment - I can tell you I have a pretty nice setup that costs me less than $1,000 all totaled (not including the camera).

 

Have a look on Amazon for things like 'DSL Rigs', 'Matte Boxes', 'Follow Focus', etc. You'll find many good products that won't break your bank account.


  • 0

#16 Tyler Purcell

Tyler Purcell
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2358 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 30 March 2016 - 04:47 PM

To me, the DSLR look is kind of "artificial" whereas the look of a proper cinema camera is more "organic" and beautiful. You want your story to get noticed? You want it to look great? Use a proper cinema camera, with real cinema lenses if you can. It's hard enough to make a movie even using real production gear...


Yep, that's absolutely right. One of the big problems is that the people who buy finished products, give you brownie points for what it was shot on and how good it looks. If you market your film as being shot on Alexa or Red, people take you seriously. If you tell them you shot it on film, they take you really seriously. It's a way for them to automatically differentiate how much you really care about your product. In today's world, the DSLR feature is so common, most sales agents won't even bother watching your movie. So unless you're self distributing, it's important to get away from that negative stigma and shoot on something that will prop you up.

To Landon's point above about Star Wars being shot on a crappy camera. It's true, but George Lucas can do anything he want's, he just sold the franchise for 4 billion dollars. He could have shot Star Wars on a iPhone and it would have made money because anything he makes, people will gobble up. When you're a young filmmaker, you need to make stuff that is more impressive then every other young filmmaker out there, that's how you get recognized.

The sad part is, a lot of people put tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands into making products without this knowledge. They waste countless years making something that no matter how good the script is, no matter how amazing the effects are, no matter how great their friends are at acting, it will never get sold. Sure, 'tangerine' was shot with an iPhone and it looked horrible. But, it was funded by the Duplass brothers and the filmmakers had been making features for over a decade prior, with a few known titles in the indy scene. Plus, the story hit home for a lot of people, it was very out there and characters/actors were very strong. It wasn't that cheap to make, a few hundred grand if I recall, but the Duplass brothers knew they'd get their money back and with limited theatrical release and international distribution, they absolutely made money off it. It's a success story that only worked because they had BIG players backing it.

As I always say, if you're on this forum asking a basic question, you probably don't have successful hollywood people backing our project. ;)

So is the camera a big problem? Well yes and no. If you don't care about distribution... then no. Shoot with anything you want. If you DO care about distribution and you DO care about about selling it and getting the opportunity to make more movies, then what camera you use is vital. Honestly, having been in this industry for quite a while, I'd rather make something that looks and sounds like a hollywood feature, even if the script isn't the hottest thing ever, just because that's what sells!
  • 0

#17 aapo lettinen

aapo lettinen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 700 posts
  • Other
  • Finland

Posted 30 March 2016 - 05:17 PM

you can shoot a multi format production if the budget allows only limited days with expensive gear. that way you can get more production value for marketing (remember making of material!) and better visuals for select scenes but can still make it happen on a limited budget. 

 

selling a film for profit is probably the most difficult part of the whole project and usually needs professional help and lots of contacts to get done. if one is intending to make a indie film purely for profit then one would maybe have better chances with lottery, if one would do the film anyway whether it'll be sold or not, then why not trying it out ;)  


  • 0

#18 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4743 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 30 March 2016 - 06:19 PM

so if i go to film festivals with my movie they cant reject me

 

They can always reject a film. You need to market it, have a selling point. Amazing performances from the cast will sell a production to film festivals before the camera will..


  • 0

#19 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4743 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 31 March 2016 - 02:20 AM

Sales agents are different, they don't have the time to warch every film sent to them. They know that broadcasters and other outlets for sales usually have cerrtain technical requirements for HD, so by stripping out DSLR shot films, they're filtering the material. Although, if your film becomes a multi award winning film at festivals, they can start to show interest, but there must be a market for it.


  • 0

#20 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4032 posts
  • Other
  • Right on the edge in London

Posted 31 March 2016 - 08:06 AM

n

 

no man i know some stuff i get what are you saying me but the queston is can i sel the movie to film festivals or tv or anywhere else <if the movie is good enough but this is another story> and knoweone can tell me that you dont have the appropriate equipment and we can play this movie nowhere exept from the internet

 

 

The film festivals  don't buy movies. It's a place where you can get your movie shown and seen.


  • 0


Willys Widgets

Zylight

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Pro 8mm

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Visual Products

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Pro 8mm

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Zylight

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

The Slider