Jump to content




Photo

K-3 loop former plunger

Krasnogorsk-3 loop formers plunger film loop film loading

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Christian Schonberger

Christian Schonberger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Sound Department
  • Lisbon

Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:22 AM

Hi group,

 

Just did some more research on the K-3 (mine is still stuck at customs, should arrive next week...).

 

I found out that one main problem with the K-3 is that the loop formers retract when the spring loaded plunger is pressed (to check if the film runs smoothly), but they will return into position (squeezing the film) when the plunger is released and only retract (=open) again when the door presses against the plunger. So the loops might be gone bad.

 

I refrain from disassembling the camera (seen it on YouTube: no way I'll attempt that). I also refrain from simply hacking off the loop formers and plunger.

 

I am toying with the idea to come up with a way to keep the plunger down once I know the film runs smoothly. This also prevents pressure on the door (which I will seal with camera tape anyway).

 

Any ideas (other than using sticky duct tape each time) how to keep the plunger down with some DIY method - without causing any kind of damage or risk of metal parts (filing, sawing etc.) getting into the camera?

 

It is out of the question getting a "pro" upgrade (removed loop formers and servicing, polishing of parts) since it would again involve customs, hassle, waiting time and more money than the camera itself is worth.

 

While I'm at it: I never understood why blowing air into the camera or mag would be of any use. Wouldn't it be much better to use a soft paint brush and a small, battery powered vacuum cleaner to make sure the dust really gets out of the way (instead of inside the camera/mag mechanism)? Just asking :-)

 

Any reply appreciated,

Christian


Edited by Christian Schonberger, 01 April 2016 - 08:25 AM.

  • 0




#2 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2182 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 01 April 2016 - 10:18 AM

Why would you want to? Either the loop former mechanism is working, in which case you don't need to interfere with it, or it isn't and you'll have to remove it.

It doesn't interfere with the loop when it's not running.

BTW removing the formers is quite straightforward.


  • 0

#3 Christian Schonberger

Christian Schonberger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Sound Department
  • Lisbon

Posted 01 April 2016 - 11:59 AM


BTW removing the formers is quite straightforward.

Thanks Mark! I am afraid of the washers, the wind up wheel attached to the plate and the sprocket wheel which has two screws and needs to be perfectly aligned in height. Please tell me more about the process if it's not too much to ask (I only know the well known black and white tutorial on YouTube).

 

My concern is: if the pull down claw isn't engaged, the loop formers, closing in again)  can cause the film to "slip" at the film gate (I guess).

 

Thanks a lot!

Cheers,

Christian


  • 0

#4 Wiliam Cardoza

Wiliam Cardoza
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts
  • Other
  • Salinas, California

Posted 01 April 2016 - 12:02 PM

When you take the loop formers off: this sounds pedantic but I wish someone would have told me.

 

Practice with a few feet of film getting the loop sizes correct: The top loop, is like, a third tighter then the bottom which kind of bows out a little bit larger: you'll know because you can only maintain the loop if it's in the right proportion (the size of the top loop vs the bottom).  Practice this several times a day and run your dummy film; wiggle your camera around and notice that the loops are "staying formed" to get your confidence up. I even close it back up, set it down, run it and then look at my loops again: I'm always amazed that the loops are still formed...

 

With unexposed film: after I set-my-loops, I usually run it at 8FPS to see if it's holding then I do a  final test at 24FPS, even pulsing it a couple times to see if the loop is holding - it's worth wasting a few feet of film in order to make sure your loop is stable.

 

It's also good to learn a couple basic magical incantations to perform on your camera or get your camera blessed by a priest, what ever kind of spiritualism floats your boat: maybe your an atheist, if so, come to embrace fatalism.

 

That being said, I've only "lost my loop" on my first roll of film. 

 

LOL


  • 0

#5 Christian Schonberger

Christian Schonberger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Sound Department
  • Lisbon

Posted 01 April 2016 - 12:18 PM

When you take the loop formers off: this sounds pedantic but I wish someone would have told me.

 

Practice with a few feet of film getting the loop sizes correct: The top loop, is like, a third tighter then the bottom which kind of bows out a little bit larger: you'll know because you can only maintain the loop if it's in the right proportion (the size of the top loop vs the bottom).  Practice this several times a day and run your dummy film; wiggle your camera around and notice that the loops are "staying formed" to get your confidence up. I even close it back up, set it down, run it and then look at my loops again: I'm always amazed that the loops are still formed...

 

With unexposed film: after I set-my-loops, I usually run it at 8FPS to see if it's holding then I do a  final test at 24FPS, even pulsing it a couple times to see if the loop is holding - it's worth wasting a few feet of film in order to make sure your loop is stable.

 

It's also good to learn a couple basic magical incantations to perform on your camera or get your camera blessed by a priest, what ever kind of spiritualism floats your boat: maybe your an atheist, if so, come to embrace fatalism.

 

That being said, I've only "lost my loop" on my first roll of film. 

 

LOL

Thanks Wiliam! Not pedantic at all! Even with great cameras like the Arriflex SR series one has to work with an inching knob to check if everything is perfectly aligned and running smoothly (to say nothing of the cumbersome loading of the mags. I'll do that with all the care in the world, with a smile on my face - just thinking about how the footage will look on glorious film! I'm a "no pain, no gain" and "no budget: work around it the best you can" - guy. 

 

Not that I am a masochist LOL, I just know that film takes a lot of care and skill. The magic will appear eventually ;-)

 

Now: anyone who wants to get rid of an Aaton Minima, Arriflex SR3 or 416? Please throw it (carefully) my way ;-) ;-) ;-)

 

Cheers,

Christian


Edited by Christian Schonberger, 01 April 2016 - 12:19 PM.

  • 0



Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Technodolly

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Pro 8mm

The Slider

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Zylight

CineLab

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Zylight

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Pro 8mm

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

CineLab