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Movies with great Environmental Cinematography


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#1 Jack Johnson_38359

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 09:16 AM

Was wondering if anyone know of any movies with great Environmental Cinematography?


This can range from space, nature, cityscape, landscape; basically, cinematography where the environment is used as the focal point or as an instrument or technique to bring about certain mood or emotions.


Director of Photography: Emmanuel Chivo Lubezki's recent work on the Revenant is of course a good example.

Edited by Jack Johnson_38359, 09 April 2016 - 09:16 AM.

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#2 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 10:23 AM

I remember Blade Runner was received very well for that.

37e69b4ae9fa76cd1b67cc9e0331e5a7.jpg


Edited by Macks Fiiod, 09 April 2016 - 10:26 AM.

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#3 JD Hartman

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 10:54 AM

Silent Running

Ferngully


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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 10:55 AM

I remember Blade Runner was received very well for that.

37e69b4ae9fa76cd1b67cc9e0331e5a7.jpg

 

Definitely a great choice.

 

For cityscapes, I would go with The French Connection (1971,) Serpico (1973,) The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 (1974,) and Taxi Driver (1976.)  As a friend of mine always says when he watches Pelham (which I love,) you can almost see the grit of the city.


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 12:15 PM

There are the sort of "world-building" science fiction / fantasy movies like "Blade Runner" (and many others, such as "City of Lost Children") and there are the ones that capture the textures of a real location such as the 1970's urban movies that Bill mentions.  And of course, historical dramas that recreate a past environment with great attention to detail (westerns such as "Heaven's Gate" or "McCabe and Mrs. Miller" come to mind immediately.)  Tarkovsky movies seem to cover all those categories.


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#6 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 08:04 PM

Some films from my movie collection:

Cityscapes:
Man with a Movie Camera
Berlin: Symphony of a Great City
Vertigo
Rome: Open City
Band of Outsiders
The Conformist
I Am Cuba
Taxi Driver
The French Connection
Annie Hall
The Warriors
Dog Day Afternoon
Ferris Bueller's Day Off
Risky Business
Chungking Express
Three Colors: Red
Se7en
Narc
Lost in Translation
City of God

Period/Nature:
Gone With the Wind
How Green Was My Valley
The Searchers
Seven Samurai
Lawrence of Arabia
L'Avventura
The Godfather, Part II
Deliverance
Tess
Paris, Texas
Amadeus
Days of Heaven
Koyaanisqatsi
The Last Emperor
Legends of the Fall
Saving Private Ryan
The Shawshank Redemption
The Thin Red Line
Pride & Prejudice
The Tree of Life
The Master

Fantasy/Science Fiction:
Nosferatu
Metropolis
The Red Shoes
Black Narcissus
2001: A Space Odessey
8 1/2
Alien
The Shining
The Empire Strikes Back
Blade Runner
Legend
The Princess Bride
Brazil
City of Lost Children
The Double Life of Veronique
Amelie
Dark City
Minority Report
The Fellowship of the Ring
The Dark Knight

Suburbia:
ET
Back to the Future
Goodfellas
American Beauty
Far From Heaven
Carol
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#7 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 03:11 PM

Suburbia:
ET
Back to the Future
Goodfellas
American Beauty
Far From Heaven
Carol

 

Sat - I'm curious to know what made you put GoodFellas in to the category of "Suburbia"...


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#8 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 03:44 PM

Some of the films fit better than others, to be sure. But I was mostly thinking of the scenes after Henry and Karen get married. Not sure what borough they're set in. Especially outside her mother's house where he asks her to hide the gun, driving around the leafy neighborhood while high, the domestic scenes. Even most of the 'city' scenes don't feel like cityscapes to me - the diner near the airport, the various dive bars, the cab stand, there's a small town kinda feel to them. Maybe as close as you get to suburbia within New York City limits?

I actually wanted to make categories by city originally but then I got lazy.
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#9 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 05:14 PM

Some of the films fit better than others, to be sure. But I was mostly thinking of the scenes after Henry and Karen get married. Not sure what borough they're set in. Especially outside her mother's house where he asks her to hide the gun, driving around the leafy neighborhood while high, the domestic scenes. Even most of the 'city' scenes don't feel like cityscapes to me - the diner near the airport, the various dive bars, the cab stand, there's a small town kinda feel to them. Maybe as close as you get to suburbia within New York City limits?

 

Yup, very accurate.  Karen's neighborhood is actually right at the Queens/Nassau border.  And I think some exteriors were shot in my current Queens neighborhood.  And yes, if you look at the framing, everything is very insular & familial - just like the old-school NYC mob did it back then. 


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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 05:25 PM

There's some great desert stuff in Dune.

 

P


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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 07:19 PM

Almost any movie where the mood, atmosphere, production design, cinematography is dominant, even oppressive, would be a good example -- "Apocalypse Now" would be one, and "Thin Red Line" in a similar vein. Or a movie where the setting was as important as the characters, something with a strong sense of place or space such as "Days of Heaven" or "2001".  Most Terry Gilliam movies -- "Brazil" for example.  I'd almost start with movies known for their strong production design, just to get going.


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#12 Wiliam Cardoza

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 12:13 AM

 "Army of Shadows" by Jean-Pierre Melville...


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#13 Sebastien Scandiuzzi

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 11:53 PM

Interesting. I immediately thought of non narrative documentaries, as in our literal environment (earth): 

 

Lessons of Darkness 

Visitors

Qatsi Trilogy 

Pina

Samsara

 

There are tons more in this genre with beautiful cinematography but those are the ones that immediately come to mind. 


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#14 Don Norman

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 01:41 AM

Giant

The Big Country

The Magnificent Seven

Lawrence of Arabia

The Birds

Ryan's Daughter

Tess

 


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