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#1 Christopher Brims

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 09:49 AM

Hello, this is my first post but I have questions about some old regular 8 film that my dad made many years ago. I need a viewer so I can look through the film and see what's on it so I can decide if I should get it transfered. I've seen a Goko GM-5005 and a Baia Model V-8 viewer on eBay. I've read that the Goko is a quality unit, but I don't know if it's compatible with regular 8.

 

Also, it seems it may have been put on the spool wrong, possibly just not rewound. When looking at the side of the reel with the film coming off on the right side, the holes in the film are away from me. I tried loading it into a Kodak Brownie 300 projector according to the instructions and the holes are on the wrong side.

 

Any help would be appreciated.


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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 10:15 AM

The second  of those is standard-8.

Your description of the layout is ambiguous, but if the film is emulsion (dull side) out, put the spool flat on the table with the film coming off in the shape of a 9 and the perfs should be nearest you. If not just wind it onto another spool.


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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 11:00 AM

That viewer doesn't look as if it would be very kind to the film. You might be better off with the projector if it works well and is clean. Do a trial run with some junk film to check it doesn't get scratched.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 09 April 2016 - 11:00 AM.

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#4 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 04:47 PM

I have a Standard 8 Minnette viewer that's very good (Minnete Eight), Goko and Zeiss Ikon were other good brands. The cheaper ones tend to have a crappier picture, Baia being at the very cheap end mostly.

 

There were "dual" models that worked with Standard or Super 8, not so great in a projector but fine for editor/viewers.


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#5 Christopher Brims

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 08:07 PM

I'll purchase some regular 8 film on eBay and run it through the projector. The projector works, I just haven't run any film through it as I don't want to risk what I have without a trial run. Thank you for your help.


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#6 Simon Wyss

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 02:02 AM

Christopher, do yourself a favour and inspect the projector thoroughly.

 

Check whether there are no burrs on the sprocket teeth, that both sides of the film gate are smooth and clean,

and that the side guide(s) work. There are better and worse projectors, too. What model do you have?

 

It would be a pity, if you got frustrated from your projection experience.

Listen to the pros, I am a theatre projectionist (among other).


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#7 Christopher Brims

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Posted 10 April 2016 - 09:58 AM

Christopher, do yourself a favour and inspect the projector thoroughly.

 

Check whether there are no burrs on the sprocket teeth, that both sides of the film gate are smooth and clean,

and that the side guide(s) work. There are better and worse projectors, too. What model do you have?

 

It would be a pity, if you got frustrated from your projection experience.

Listen to the pros, I am a theatre projectionist (among other).

 

I've got the Model 1. My dad purchased it on eBay some time ago, I had to take it apart to replace the power cord as it was falling apart. The tapered rubber piece attached to the motor doesn't engage properly both directions without some help, but I can make it work to go through 1 film.

 

I'll take out the sprocket and check the teeth carefully. The gate looked smooth, I'll run some Q-tip heads or something over them to check for any burrs, I know it needs a little more cleaning with detail brushes.

 

Where are the side guides located?

 

I appreciate all the help I can get from the pros, it's one of better ways to learn.


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#8 Simon Wyss

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 01:51 AM

Model 1 what?

 

Film guides in the gate


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#9 Mark Dunn

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 03:45 AM

He said. Brownie 300.

It may be tricky to get at the gate on that one. The side guides are sprung to steady the film laterally. They need to be free to move.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 11 April 2016 - 03:51 AM.

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#10 Simon Wyss

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 09:21 AM

Excuse me, Christopher, Kodak Brownie 300, Model 1.

 

Well, that is not the best projector for Regular-Eight film but it is one.

A better make is gentle* to film, allows you to keep it clean and lubricated.

As Mark points out, it begins to be tricky already with that. A tube brush will

be practical.

 

I should suggest a Paillard-Bolex M8. Oil lube system, everything

accessible, good mechanics, good lenses, modernisation possible

for halogen bulbs instead of the old tube lamps (if wanted). The best

American 8mm projector is the old Bell & Howell Filmo 8, all gears,

no belts, no plastic.

_______________

 

*Small sprocket drums are better to transport shrunken film.


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#11 Christopher Brims

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Posted 11 April 2016 - 09:35 AM

I figured the Brownie wasn't that great of a model, it's the one my dad had purchased; it sure is a PITA to clean and repair. It looks like I can get a decent looking Paillard-Bolex for not a lot of money, the Bell & Howell is a little out of my price range. I definately want to be gentle to the film, I know it's already seen a hard life. Thank you all for the advice and guidance.


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#12 Christopher Brims

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 03:43 PM

My Bolex M8 arrived yesterday, I cleaned all the dust off it, plugged it in, and turned it on. The lamp works, motor runs, etc. I ran an inexpensive film I bought through it. All was well except the speed control, that doesn't work. When I opened the bottom of the case, the 2 resistive coils are coming apart. I'm currently contacting some companies that Bolex told me to contact to replace that part. Also I need to clean the film I want to run, when I rewound it I found a some taped splices where the tape has come off and left the adhesive. But I'm slowly progressing.

 

I found running my test film through the projector rather interesting.

 

I also found another regular 8 film, I think a 2 or 3 inch reel; it's in bad shape, the film is twisted. I also found another reel that is super 8; of course that would happen. I've been looking for super 8 projectors based on some searches from this and other forums, but those run from $400 to $1,000 which is a bit out of my price range. Any recommendations for a similar grade of super 8 projectors?


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#13 Simon Wyss

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 01:01 AM

The resistor thing is known with the M8 but easily accessible and repairable.

 

You’re already in the midst of film. Didn’t know that you have tape spliced films. Some folks don’t like the splicing work but that is the Holy Grail of cinema. Negative cutters and assemblers are well paid technicians, so be proud to share their living. :lol:

 

Agfa Splicer Regular-8.jpg

One of the best amateur cement splicers


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#14 Mark Dunn

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 04:31 AM

Elmo or Eumig should be fine for Super-8 but if you just want to review a viewer might be cheaper- Goko, or the cheaper Minette or Muray.

Standard-8 tape splicers are pretty rare but CIR is the name to look for. As Simon suggests you may have to use cement.

Or maybe go and have another look in the attic.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 22 April 2016 - 04:37 AM.

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#15 Christopher Brims

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 05:07 PM

The resistor thing is known with the M8 but easily accessible and repairable.

 

You’re already in the midst of film. Didn’t know that you have tape spliced films. Some folks don’t like the splicing work but that is the Holy Grail of cinema. Negative cutters and assemblers are well paid technicians, so be proud to share their living. :lol:

 

attachicon.gifAgfa Splicer Regular-8.jpg

One of the best amateur cement splicers

 

Is there a source for a replacement resistor or is it just hand rewind it or replace with a potentiometer?

 

As far as splicing, that's how I found the film from when my dad was in his 20s; I'm just trying to make the best of what I've got.

 

Elmo or Eumig should be fine for Super-8 but if you just want to review a viewer might be cheaper- Goko, or the cheaper Minette or Muray.

Standard-8 tape splicers are pretty rare but CIR is the name to look for. As Simon suggests you may have to use cement.

Or maybe go and have another look in the attic.

 

I'll look around and see what comes up for super 8.


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