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Super35 vs Full-frame properties?


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#1 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 12:44 PM

So I've raised myself on Canon DSLR video for years. A few months ago, I got a hold of my first video camera with a Super35 CMOS sensor (F3) rather than one originally designed for stills. When I started taking shots with the same lights, lenses, and techniques, the F3 had a totally different visual feel to it. The frame exploded with depth in contrast to my DSLRs which now feel flat. Also motion registered with a lot more silk than before.

 

I guess what I'm wondering is, is that just the natural property of a Super35 sensor over a full frame still sensor? Or was it just because I was so used to cameras much cheaper, meaning the sensor's form factor isn't as important?

 

Was considering an A7s, but don't want another static image like the DSLR I already have.

 

Thanks for your input, whatever it may be.


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#2 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 12:52 PM

A Super 35 sensor (18x24mm-ish) is about 1/2 the size of a 35mm full frame sensor (24x36mm) like the 5D. So you'll typically use wider lenses to compensate for the reduced field of view. This results in more depth-of-field if you're using the same f-stop. To get the same effect on a full frame sensor, simply stop down the aperture by an extra two stops.

Not sure about the motion. Less rolling shutter maybe?
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#3 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 01:15 PM

 

 

A Super 35 sensor (18x24mm-ish) is about 1/2 the size of a 35mm full frame sensor (24x36mm) like the 5D. So you'll typically use wider lenses to compensate for the reduced field of view. This results in more depth-of-field if you're using the same f-stop. To get the same effect on a full frame sensor, simply stop down the aperture by an extra two stops.

Not sure about the motion. Less rolling shutter maybe?

Rolling shutter just improves the more sophisticated the CMOS sensor is, right? Also if the crop is what's giving me the depth I like, would you recommend whatever cropped counterpart there is of the a7s?


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#4 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 01:40 PM

The amount of rolling shutter effect is based on the readout speed of the sensor. The faster the data gets dumped off the sensor, the less rolling shutter effect you will see. So typically, more advanced and more expensive cameras have less rolling shutter. But not always, since it depends on the design.

The A7s has an APS-C crop mode natively. It's a little noiser, but it has less rolling shutter than the full frame mode. I use it when I want to put PL mount cinema glass on the camera. Works great.
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#5 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 01:42 PM

 

Alright. Thanks for the info!


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#6 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 07:46 PM

Here is a very handy visual comparison chart from Abel Cine

 

http://blog.abelcine...lSensors_13.pdf


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