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Quality of Reflected Light VS Diffused - anyone used K-Flect system?


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#1 Josh Tree Park

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 05:16 PM

https://www.youtube....h?v=dNgdAti0DLQ
 

Anyone have an experience with this K-Flect system?
 
I've been tracking their product for a while, but haven't had much experience with it. The idea of reflecting different light based on the texture and light distribution sounds like an interesting concept, not to mention their minimal foot print of equipment on set. What do you think about this system? Worth replacing your 8x8 rags and bounces?


Edited by Josh Tree Park, 15 April 2016 - 05:22 PM.

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#2 andrew ward

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Posted 15 April 2016 - 06:16 PM

It looks amazing but I dont think its practical. If a DP owned it and used it, would be awesome. But if a gaffer tries it the DP wont use it right and make it pointless. Just a funky piece of poly.
Also, dont have the lamps we need for it
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 11:11 AM

That looks like much more of a nightmare to set up than it's really worth-- not to mention not having nearly the ability to move around as you'd really like.

if you're just doing product shots on say, a lazy susan for a series of things, sure, maybe, though no need to buy a "system" for this.


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#4 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 18 April 2016 - 02:38 PM

This is a version of Christian Berger's Cine Reflect Lighting System, which I believe he developed in the late 90s-early 00s while shooting for Michael Haneke. The first film he used it on was Haneke's 'The Piano Teacher.' (NSFL, btw!)

http://www.christianberger.at/crls/

Seems like it's development was at least partially ideological, sort of a way to demonstrate a more environmental resource-friendly alternative to the orthodoxy.

For example, if you only need 1x powerful HMI and the emphasis shifts from cutting light to adding small reflectors, then theoretically you no longer need a tow plant, heavy cable runs, power distro, or even a grip truck. While this might work on a small independent film, it won't work on larger projects where the Electric dept still need to run power to the Mohos or wherever HMU and Production is happening, plus video village, etc. For that reason, I don't think the CRLS system ever became mainstream. It's still a neat idea, but I wouldn't replace any of your existing tools with it. If anything, it would be cool to have a small kit to augment your existing package.
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 12:11 AM

I could see using it on a show if you're doing a fair bit of marco work or specialized insert stuff, table top stuff, etc. I just honestly don't see a major benefit in most shooting situations playing pool with light (to that degree)


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#6 andrew ward

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 02:04 AM

But it looks like a cool toy.
Nothing is more fun than impressing a DP with a triple mirror bounce!
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#7 Shawn Sagady

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 04:59 AM

Reminds me of Egyptian light reflectors.  This would be an absolute nightmare to set up and make useful on a large scale set though.  And using the sun seems like your light levels would become pretty inconsistent anywhere but high noon.


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#8 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 05:38 AM

Does sort of look light lighting, made difficult to me TBH.. 


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#9 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 06:20 PM

Nothing is more fun than impressing a DP with a triple mirror bounce!


Triple bounce is always better than a double bounce! Also, triple book lights where you bounce into Day Blue muslin and diffuse through a microscopically thin sheet of plywood. Nothing diffuses like plywood, I tell you!
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#10 JD Hartman

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 06:44 PM

Triple bounce is always better than a double bounce! Also, triple book lights where you bounce into Day Blue muslin and diffuse through a microscopically thin sheet of plywood. Nothing diffuses like plywood, I tell you!

 

What type of plywood would you use?  Certainly not plebeian CDX and plywood composed of verniers from many endangered  tropical trees are now banned from import to the USA.  So using "real" Lauan ply is out of the question.  So Oak, Birch, Cherry, Apple?  Maybe Baltic Birch if you are shooting in Eastern Europe? 

 

Inquiring minds want to know.


Edited by JD Hartman, 19 April 2016 - 06:44 PM.

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#11 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 09:06 PM

It's not about the wood specifically, it's about the quality of the worms in the wood. You want weevils for the best effect, of course.
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#12 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 07:50 AM

I also use silkworms reared by virgins.. imported from Tibet..


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#13 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 04:31 PM

Dammit, I forgot the virgins. Now I know your secret to success Robin!
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#14 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 10:28 PM

Silk Worms, virgins.. and a pint of Gin in a dirty glass.. always works for me Satsuki Sama


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#15 andrew ward

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 05:23 AM

American Cinematographer says Roger Deakins always uses CineWood ™.
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#16 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 06:24 AM

Im pretty sure he uses Panaplank    sometimes in conjunction with Arri Rawdust


Edited by Robin R Probyn, 21 April 2016 - 06:25 AM.

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#17 andrew ward

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 01:46 PM

Youre thinking of Richardson.

Deakins has his guys make up 60x60 panels of those novelty christmas lights shaped like reindeer, paints them all with hairspray that equates to nd0 and then puts them all in the lighting truck and closes the doors. The knowledge that theyre there changes the actors performance. I blame him for Lupita Nyongo who has yet to not ruin a film.
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#18 Igor Trajkovski

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 04:11 PM

I recently became aware of the CRLS and watched couple of interesting videos.

For anybody interested:
 

A RIVER OF LIGHT - Interview with DoP Christian Berger about CRLS

 

 

Movie sets lighting samples in the following:

CRLS - Cine Reflect Lighting System - Part 1

CRLS - Cine Reflect Lighting System - Part 2
 

 

and great overview of the components and setup in English:

Cine Reflect Lighting System - how can I work with it?

 

...

 

One think i liked was Christian's intent on lighting with this so
there is very little light falloff and the performance is less hindered for the actors.

 

It needs another mindset on using this.... :)

 

 

Best

Igor


Edited by Igor Trajkovski, 21 April 2016 - 04:13 PM.

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#19 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 04:44 PM

Im pretty sure he uses Panaplank    sometimes in conjunction with Arri Rawdust


Can you buy Panaplank in the Panastore? I heard a rumor that Arri Rawdust is just regular sawdust in a gold bottle.

Sorry Igor, carry on!
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#20 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 21 April 2016 - 07:48 PM

Panaplank was used on all John Carpenter films .. for added grain.. I saw it in American Cinematographer .. 


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