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Color Grading Monitor


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#1 Jesse Frank

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 11:30 AM

So this is an aspect of film production that I have neglected to understand and learn about.  I'm using a ASUS monitor from Best Buy for my timeline, and an old DELL monitor for video preview.  If I position the Premiere Pro preview window between the two, I can tell there is a drastic difference in color.

 

I've gotten pretty good at eyeballing stuff, but I want to speed up my work flow by being able to see what the actual color of the image is.  I also want to be able to render out a video, and have my TV and monitor look exactly the same.  How should I go about doing this?

 

Note: I understand that there will be some minor differences in contrast between an unrendered video file, and an MPEG 2 file.   


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#2 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 11:43 AM

Here is a good article about it:

http://jonnyelwyn.co...ing-monitors-2/
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#3 Bruce Greene

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 01:00 PM

So this is an aspect of film production that I have neglected to understand and learn about.  I'm using a ASUS monitor from Best Buy for my timeline, and an old DELL monitor for video preview.  If I position the Premiere Pro preview window between the two, I can tell there is a drastic difference in color.

 

I've gotten pretty good at eyeballing stuff, but I want to speed up my work flow by being able to see what the actual color of the image is.  I also want to be able to render out a video, and have my TV and monitor look exactly the same.  How should I go about doing this?

 

Note: I understand that there will be some minor differences in contrast between an unrendered video file, and an MPEG 2 file.   

You'll need two things:

 

A video card to bypass the OS level video out (data only, no color manipulation) and a calibrated video monitor.

 

I would first suggest the Blackmagic mini monitor.  It's not a monitor, but a video display card and costs only $150.  There are PCI and Thunderbolt versions.

 

You'll also need a a calibrated display.  I've been using an Eizo CX271, calibrated for REC709 (HD standard video).  Do do this, you'll also need a calibration light meter.  I'm using an EyeOne Display Pro with the colornavigator software from Eizo (comes with the display)  It's not perfect, but you won't go too wrong with this type of set up.  The Eizo display saves the calibration on a chip in the display (not in the OS) and it's plugged into the blackmagic card via HDMI.  All told, this costs $1900 for the display, calibrator and video card.

 

You might look at this new monitor, as it has improved blacks over previous LCD monitors:  http://www.bhphotovi...Top Nav-Search=

 

Good luck!


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#4 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 03:26 PM

+1 on the Black Magic Mini Monitor. It has HDMI and SDI outputs and works great with Premiere CC.

The calibrated monitor is the preferred route for sure. If that's not possible, then at least you can plug your HDMI tv into it and see the image on the same monitor.
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#5 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 04:18 PM

I use 2 x Black Magic Mini Monitors, one going HDMI to an 8-bit home cinema projector and the other sending a 10-bit HDMI to my 7" Atomos Shogun, which I not only use to record and monitor in the field, but use for color correction checking as well. It's pretty small at 7", but you can zoom in 100% and it has tons of other features. When calibrated with the probe it provides a 100% REC 709 at 10-bit monitor, something that is basically unheard of outside of the $3,000 - $5,000 FSI monitors.

 

The Shogun can now be had for about a $1,000 - which is still the cheapest color grading monitor you can find that will give you TRUE 10-bit and be able to calibrate to 100% REC 709. I think the Ninja Assasin will do the 10-bit as well, it's just I needed the XLR inputs for field recording that only come on the Shogun. 

 

Most LCD/LED PC Panels are 8 bit, and even those that advertise as 10-bit are usually not full 10-bit, but rather 8-bit with a bit of fudgery going on. True 10-bit monitoring a must, escpecially if your footage is 10-bit or higher. 

 

I don't rely 100% on my 7" though in correction. I have calibrated my projector to martch about 93% of Rec 709, so most of the grade is done on that and then it's spot checked on the 7" to ensure some of the more extremes look good. 


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 24 April 2016 - 04:23 PM.

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