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16mm Anamaphoric conversion

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#1 Sandra MacNeish

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 04:03 PM

I am just curious to know if any member on here could possibly help. I have some digital content that I shot on a DV camera at 1080p which shows as 16x9 on my TV. I have the opportunity to get this footage converted over to 16mm film. Here is my question.
I want the conversion to be scope so when I project it on the wall it will be a true wide screen format NO BLACK BARS !! I use Adobe Premiere CC14 for my editing and I would like to know how I could save of my final project so when it goes to 16mm print
 I would need my scope lens to view it the way it was intended. I do not really want to  crop out to much of the original footage. Any help on how to do this would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Sandra


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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 05:02 PM

You would need to apply a squeeze to your video before exporting it and getting it transferred to film. I assume that your scope lens is for projecting feature films shot in scope, which is 2.39:1, which is wider than 16 x 9, but are you talking about the lens that was fitted to DV cameras to allow 4 x3 cameras to shoot 16 x 9?


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#3 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 05:03 PM

I have never done a 16mm film out, but I imagine they want DPX files, which are essentially just still images. Premiere can export DPX, but I'd call the lab in questions and ask them what their preferred delivery method is. 

 

As for getting them in a cinemascope format from 16:9: that is easy. Simply click on 'sequence' and then 'sequence settings' and change the timeline resolution to a cinema scope resolution, which I'd suggest 2048 x 858, as that is DCI-compliant scope. You'll have to increase the size of your 1080 slightly to do this, but it shouldn't be that hard.

 

Now, as for how a lab would handle a film out like that, I have idea. I don't think cinemascope is a standard for 16mm film, so I don't know if maybe they'd want you to delivery in 16:9 with black bars, or rather there is another method another forum member could suggest.

 

It's possible you'll need to do a squeez on the 16:9 to get it into a anamorphic format rather than delivering a 2.39:1 image sequence, though I'm not sure.


Edited by Landon D. Parks, 27 April 2016 - 05:05 PM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 05:11 PM

If you shot 16x9 and you want to make a scope 16mm print with no black bars, you have to crop the image from 1.78 to 2.40 (16mm scope might even be wider than 2.40, like 2.66 : 1).  Unless you can live with black bars on the sides, but I don't see why a 1.78 frame with black bars on the side of scope projection is an improvement over a 1.78 frame with black bars top & bottom for regular 16mm projection.


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