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How Did They Light This Table Top?

table top lighting

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#1 Shane McGee

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 10:25 PM

Hi,

 

I was curious if anyone has any guesses on how exactly they achieve this seemingly simple overhead camera shot, as far as lighting...especially on a white table top like this?

 

 

e365c06.png

 

 

Is it just one large source from the upper left? Is that light higher up (vertically) or around table level or...?

 

Is there likely a fill light from bottom right, or just some bounce to fill in? Is it likely lit over the top as well? Its just pretty even looking...

 

 

 

Anyways, just curious if anyone has achieved this look before, or has any thoughts on how best to do it?

 

(Obviously while still allowing room for the camera rigged from above...and also the hands entering the frame from different angles, etc.)

 

 

 

Thanks for your thoughts.

 

 


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 10:39 PM

Probably big soft light from the left and a big white card on the right (or another soft light that was not as bright.)


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#3 Jean G

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 05:55 AM

Probably big soft light from the left and a big white card on the right (or another soft light that was not as bright.)

I'm also going with this. I would like to add that the screens have been put in in post.


Edited by Jean G, 10 May 2016 - 05:56 AM.

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#4 Shane McGee

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 01:43 PM

Probably big soft light from the left and a big white card on the right (or another soft light that was not as bright.)

 

 

Thanks David.

 

How big of a light source would you start out with for something like this...with this amount of softness? Maybe Diva Lite through a 4x4, 6x6, etc...shower curtain? :-)


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#5 Shane McGee

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Posted 10 May 2016 - 01:44 PM

I'm also going with this. I would like to add that the screens have been put in in post.

 

Yeah, good call on that. I wonder if that glass edge reflection is put back in somehow as well?

 

Also, I'm curious how they do the black shots of seemingly the same white shots...?


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#6 JIGNESH JHAVERI

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 05:57 AM

I may be wrong, but I think the phones have been rendered in CG. 

 

Most of the product images these days from Apple etc are rendered from 3D Models in Keyshot.

 

I could be wrong, but my guess is the phones are CGI.

 

At a couple of points, I see the screen edge highlights below the finger of the hand. If I was shooting this for Samsung, I know they'd want their phones looking 'perfect' and would do the same.

 

Attached Images

  • Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.48.25-am.jpg
  • Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.48.12-am.jpg

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#7 timHealy

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 08:17 PM

I have worked on one series of Samsung tabletop commercials and these things are way more complicated than everyone here thinks. (except David) There are a lot of reflective surfaces including the screen. that need to be lit and dialed in. They typically do a few commercials in one day or over a few days. These phones are not CGI. They are selling the product. However the screens may be embellished depending on what is on the screen at the time.

 

This may look relatively easy but tabletop photography can be surrounded with large sources, fill lights, reflective fill lights or show cards and bounce boards, Silver and gold show cards, mixed daylight and tungsten sources, and solids for unwanted reflections.

 

Tabletop can be mind numbing and tedious. Just saying

 

Best

 

Tim


Edited by timHealy, 19 May 2016 - 08:19 PM.

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#8 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 08:34 PM

Maybe not in this case.. but in my limited experience of studio shoots.. the white background  look that Apple made trendy,and associated with High Tech.. a few years back .. is often shot green screen.. and the "white" is put in in post.. .


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#9 Shane McGee

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 04:00 PM

This may look relatively easy but tabletop photography can be surrounded with large sources, fill lights, reflective fill lights or show cards and bounce boards, Silver and gold show cards, mixed daylight and tungsten sources, and solids for unwanted reflections.

 

Tabletop can be mind numbing and tedious. Just saying

 

 

 

 

Thanks Tim. The difficultly and complexity is definitely not lost on me. This is why I'm absolutely fascinated with it!

 

There seems to be surprisingly little info out there for this type of thing too, as far as behind the scenes explanations of lighting and examples of the results, etc.


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#10 Jean G

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Posted 21 May 2016 - 06:12 AM

 

 

Thanks Tim. The difficultly and complexity is definitely not lost on me. This is why I'm absolutely fascinated with it!

 

There seems to be surprisingly little info out there for this type of thing too, as far as behind the scenes explanations of lighting and examples of the results, etc.

Here's some bts from a job past week.

Hope it helps!

 

To light up the glas:

2 skypanels through 1/1 diff camera right

 

To control reflections:

1 bbs area bounced into a overhead poly

bouncecard 45degree above mattebox

 

To light the background:

4 bank kino

 

L1050343.jpg

 

L1050342.jpg


Edited by Jean G, 21 May 2016 - 06:14 AM.

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#11 Akos Baranya

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Posted 22 May 2016 - 11:05 AM

 well seeing that setup above was a sobering experience, here is a *shittier* tabletop setup i did for thankfully unreflective objects:

 

33c6d74.jpg


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#12 timHealy

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 09:31 PM

Maybe not in this case.. but in my limited experience of studio shoots.. the white background  look that Apple made trendy,and associated with High Tech.. a few years back .. is often shot green screen.. and the "white" is put in in post.. .

 

 

 

Generally speaking, I think a green screen may not be a great idea for a phone with reflective glass and aluminum surfaces. Just saying. I'm sure there are times where green screen could work, but a black or white background may be better.

 

I can recall one Samsung series where white was the background and another series where black was the background. One had a motion control camera and a turntable, and the other most phones were attached to a grip stand or held by an actor's hand which in turn was supported by a grip stand and pad to keep steady.

 

Best

 

Tim


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#13 Robin R Probyn

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 03:17 AM

Yes thats true sir.. esp for shiny stuff.. Ive done a few small scale commercial/ corp shoots where in the end, the background was white .. but they always shot green screen to be able to "control" the whiteness.. for want of a better word .. :)  in post .. it all started from those iconic Apple commercials.. then everyone wanted the same look ! 


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#14 Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos

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Posted 07 June 2016 - 03:48 AM

I think Apple’s photographer Peter Belanger used to talk about his Apple photoshoots on his blog (and elsewhere):

 

http://www.peterbelanger.com/


Edited by Alexandros Angelopoulos Apostolos, 07 June 2016 - 03:49 AM.

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