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Stock Video Shoots


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#1 wulffmedia

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 05:13 AM

Does anybody have any experience with the various Stock Footage houses? What is the median pay when they set an assignment? How quick do they pay? Do they work with advanced royalties? Flat rate? Thanks for any insight.

Edited by wulffmedia, 07 June 2005 - 05:14 AM.

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#2 Tim J Durham

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 06:14 AM

Does anybody have any experience with the various Stock Footage houses? What is the median pay when they set an assignment? How quick do they pay? Do they work with advanced royalties? Flat rate? Thanks for any insight.

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Since there's about 20,000 stock houses out there, you'll have to make some phone calls to get your answers. Most of the good (big) ones were formed to represent particular people and are very discriminating. Atleast that's true of big photo agencies like Gamma-Liaison, Black Star, Woodfin Camp, etc. Shooting stuff on spec and trying to get someone to buy it from you is a tough row to hoe. HOWEVER, if you happen to be the only camera on hand when the President falls off his bike (or some similarly momentous occurence) you can make some short-term cash. But with them it's always, "what have you done for me lately?". They're not later likely to call you up and say, "hey Wolf, we loved what you did with the President! Now get to the airport, we want to fly you to Tahiti..."
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#3 wulffmedia

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 11:49 PM

Since there's about 20,000 stock houses out there, you'll have to make some phone calls to get your answers.

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Yeah, I realize that. My question was regarding experience with these houses from the users of this forum. I'm also not speaking about "spec" shooting. My question was directed at those DP's who work with the houses and their assessment of the various houses. Calling the stock houses would not give me the insight for which I was looking.
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#4 Richard Boddington

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 11:52 PM

Getty Images will require a minimum of 100 accepted "assets" just to get started.

That means 100 sellable stock shots. Before you think that's not very many, think again, shots of your street or dog don't cut it. By sellable shots they mean some thing big & unique that people will pay money for, ie an aerial shot of the Statue Of Liberty or an incredible time lapse sunset that could be used in a commercial for a billion dollar cruise line.

So you can see that shooting 100 of these shots is no easy feat.

All of this work will have to be done 100% at your own expense and on your own time. There is no way on earth they will advance you money to go and shoot stuff for them. You will NOT get an assignment from Getty or any other stock footage house to go off to Africa and shoot the Mujamba Tribe for six weeks, get that idea out of your head.

If and when they accept your work you will be paid a commission when ever your work sells usually 40-50%. So even though they may have your shots under management, you may never get any money as the client decides what shots they want.

Basically you need a huge library to make any money, and this can take many years and hundreds of thousands of dollars to build.

FYI, don't waste your time shooting video. If you want respect in the stock footage world you shoot film, preferably 35mm. So again you can imagine the costs involved.

Stock houses prefer 35 because then you have the neg which can be used for feature films, HD, NTSC or PAL. It covers all the bases.

It has taken me nine years to build my library at a cost of over $400,000.00.

Now for the upside...once you do get going you will have life long residual income and you will not be reliant on others to hire you. Plus, you will OWN your work, and this benefit can not be understated. If you DOP a film for some one else, they own the work and you will most likely not see a penny in residuals.

R,
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