Jump to content


Photo

Projector Question


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Mark Day

Mark Day
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Greenville, SC

Posted 17 May 2016 - 11:21 AM

I have the Bolex double 8 cameras and was just curious about something - didn't want to take it for granted. Once the film has been developed, then split into the two 8mm reels, is that film now considered "standard" 8mm?  What I'm asking is; is that film compatible with the standard 8mm projectors?  The width seems like it would be, 16/2 = 8, but I was curious about the perforations, etc...

Thanks


  • 0

#2 Nicholas Kovats

Nicholas Kovats
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 503 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Shoot film! facebook.com/UltraPan8WidescreenFilm

Posted 17 May 2016 - 11:35 AM

Yes. In fact R8mm perforations are identical to 16mm perfs meaning that R8 film can be used in 16mm projectors for checking your footage. 

 

I have the Bolex double 8 cameras and was just curious about something - didn't want to take it for granted. Once the film has been developed, then split into the two 8mm reels, is that film now considered "standard" 8mm?  What I'm asking is; is that film compatible with the standard 8mm projectors?  The width seems like it would be, 16/2 = 8, but I was curious about the perforations, etc...

Thanks


  • 0

#3 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2342 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 17 May 2016 - 11:54 AM

Yes. In fact R8mm perforations are identical to 16mm perfs meaning that R8 film can be used in 16mm projectors for checking your footage. 

 

Only before it has been slit, which is usually done by the lab. So you'd have to get it sent to you unslit, check it, then send it back for slitting.


  • 0

#4 Mark Day

Mark Day
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Greenville, SC

Posted 17 May 2016 - 12:07 PM

No, what I'm asking is that once I get the slit film back, is it compatible with an 8mm projector?  I know dual 8 is actually 16mm film but when it's sent to the lab, they slit it and make each side 8mm.  Is that compatible with a regular 8mm projector?  I know it's not Super 8, but does it then (once slit) become standard 8mm?  Or is it only viewable through one of Bolexes18-5 projectors.  Can I use a standard B&H, for instance?


  • 0

#5 Mark Day

Mark Day
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Greenville, SC

Posted 17 May 2016 - 12:08 PM

Does it seem like I'm new to all of this?
  • 0

#6 Nicholas Kovats

Nicholas Kovats
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 503 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Shoot film! facebook.com/UltraPan8WidescreenFilm

Posted 17 May 2016 - 12:13 PM

You cannot project R8 films in a Super 8 projector and vice versa. Different perforation dimensions and positioning. So yes. R8 films (8mm wide)  are utilized in R8 or Double 8 projectors.  


  • 0

#7 Mark Day

Mark Day
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Greenville, SC

Posted 17 May 2016 - 12:26 PM

OK then, your saying that I can project my 8mm film (shot in my D8L after it's been split) in a standard 8mm projector? My Super 8 film has to be projected in a Super 8projector.
  • 0

#8 Nicholas Kovats

Nicholas Kovats
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 503 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Shoot film! facebook.com/UltraPan8WidescreenFilm

Posted 17 May 2016 - 12:30 PM

Will you believe me if I repeat the affirmation a third time?  


  • 1

#9 Mark Day

Mark Day
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Greenville, SC

Posted 17 May 2016 - 12:37 PM

R8?  I don't know what that means unless it means "Regular 8".  With different formats, perforations, etc..., although sometimes it appears to simple common sense, many times it isn't.


  • 0

#10 Michael Lehnert

Michael Lehnert
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1086 posts
  • Other
  • London, UK / Basel, CH

Posted 17 May 2016 - 01:23 PM

Mark,

Everyone in this forum is very happy to help out newcomers, and there are actually hundreds of threads answering potential questions in great depth.

What is not so much appreciated is raising questions that with quick web search on wikipedia, or in this forum, could easily be answered by itself.

It will also be rather difficult to evade the impression that someone is hogging fellow forists' time, or out to troll, if answers are provided, yet to seem to fail to get it because of obvious trivialities. I think you will accept that R8 is hardly a short form for Random 8mm, for example.

Here's everything you need to know: https://en.m.wikiped...ndard_8_mm_film

With best wishes, /-M
  • 0

#11 Mark Day

Mark Day
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Greenville, SC

Posted 17 May 2016 - 02:06 PM

Got it.  Thanks.


  • 0

#12 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2342 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 17 May 2016 - 02:15 PM

Will you believe me if I repeat the affirmation a third time?  

You did refer to a "double-8 projector" which doesn't really exist.

OP, there was no need to refer to Standard (or Regular, in American) 8 as anything other that just 8mm until Super-8 came along. So Standard-8 is sometimes still referred to as 8mm. Super-8 never is. All the two have in common is the width of the film- frame size, perf size and pitch, and even where the perf is in relation to the frame are all different. In 8mm, it's on the frameline, like 16mm; in S-8, it's halfway down the frame. This protects the perf when the film is edited- you don't have to cut the perf in half.

8mm. perfs are the same size as on 16mm, but half the pitch. I have viewed slit 8mm. on my Steenbeck very, very carefully- you get two frames at a time.

There are some dual-gauge projectors but the engineering is a bit of a fudge so they're not recommended.


  • 0

#13 Mark Day

Mark Day
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Greenville, SC

Posted 17 May 2016 - 03:01 PM

Well, I opened Michael's link and did some research.  Guess I should've done that to begin with.  I feel so ashamed.  Actually, I learned a whole lot and now feel kinda stoopid asking some of those questions.  Anyway, thanks to Michael, Nick, and yourself for setting me straight.  I now know what I need to know.  I need to purchase a projector, splicer, and editor that handles both 8mm and Super 8.


  • 0

#14 Andries Molenaar

Andries Molenaar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 668 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Amsterdam

Posted 18 May 2016 - 02:13 AM

Numerous projectors and viewers can properly run and project Super-8 or Regular-8. These have a switch which only needs positioning the the one or the other :)


  • 0


Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Technodolly

Tai Audio

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc