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Shooting Day for Night


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#1 Marcus Taplin

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 09:18 AM

Shooting a D for N exterior scene in the next week for the first time and was wondering if you might be able to give me some advice. Shooting on Arri Amira with Cooke S4s planning to shooting 4k 60fps, will rate the camera at 800.

 

We will have access to generators and some punch lights (HMI or ECO Punches) if need be. Also will be adding in some heavy fog and fake snow so wondering if there are any things to think about or watch out for when dealing with SFX when shooting D for N exteriors.

I have attached a picture of our location the one that is in full day light with sun on camera right side on a cloudy day at 6pm.

 

Also is a pic of our reference boards we are going for, we will have some heavy clouds of fog rolling through the scene that our actor will be walking though.

I am planning to do some tests this week. But, wanted to ask for your advice if there is anything besides the obvious of trying to not shoot the sky

 

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  • Screen Shot 2016-06-02 at 8.18.32 AM.png

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#2 Marcus Taplin

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 09:20 AM

Here is the picture that closer represents the amount of fog I plan to have. 

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Edited by Marcus Taplin, 02 June 2016 - 09:21 AM.

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#3 Mark Kenfield

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 09:38 AM

You'll need to schedule your time of day for shooting, and the angles you shoot from, around the position of the sun. You'll need the fog backlit to create the sort of effect you want.

 

And longer lenses with greater compression will be your friend when it comes to making it feel like the fog is everywhere (fewer patchy spots on the edge of frame).


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 09:46 AM

Heavy smoke is a good idea, try to shoot in backlight.  Use ND grads to darken the top of the smoke & sky, plus heavy regular ND's to reduce depth of field.


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