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Check Your Masters!


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#1 Matt Butler

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 02:22 AM

About twenty years ago(how time flies) I produced several 35mm anamorphic short films.Back in those days the cinemas in Australia ran shorts before the feature.

I needed to re-transfer the 35mm prints, and part of the exercise involved viewing the original telecine transfers on 1" videotape and standard Betacam masters.

This is where the story gets a bit sticky - literally - some of them just couldn't play, or suffered from serious drop outs etc. OK, the masters were stored in my relatively dry basement - not exactly SMPTE archiving specs. next to the large tins contaning the film prints.

The good news was that the re-transfer of the original prints on a digital telecine to digiBeta was superb! great colour and sharp as a tack.
There was a slight magenta cast in the prints, easily graded out and I guess I'll have to go through the same exercise again in twenty years to a new data capture medium!
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 06:33 AM

About twenty years ago(how time flies) I produced several 35mm anamorphic short films.Back in those days the cinemas in Australia ran shorts before the feature.

I needed to re-transfer the 35mm prints, and part of the exercise involved viewing the original telecine transfers on 1" videotape and standard Betacam masters.

This is where the story gets a bit sticky - literally - some of them just couldn't play, or suffered from serious drop outs etc. OK, the masters were stored in my relatively dry basement -  not exactly SMPTE archiving specs. next to the large tins contaning the film prints.

The good news was that the re-transfer of the original prints on a digital telecine to digiBeta was superb! great colour and sharp as a tack.
There was a slight magenta cast in the prints, easily graded out and I guess I'll have to go through the same exercise again in twenty years to a new data capture medium!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Thats sounds like a good reason to shoot film!
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#3 Matt Pacini

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 12:30 PM

Thats sounds like a good reason to shoot film!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


That's what I keep saying.
Dropouts on an analog tape are one thing. dropouts in a digtal format can be death.
This doesn't even bring into account the fact that you will probably not be able to find anyone in 20 years that can deal with any of the present digital formats.

MP
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#4 drew_town

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 12:04 AM

I tend to make data DVD's of some of my final projects with uncompressed or dv QuickTime files. It's faster than reconnecting media via tape even though it might take a handfull of them per project. I haven't been shooting that long, and I think my oldest tapes are probably only four years old. I haven't had any trouble yet.

One thing that kills me though, at work most people are too cheap to actually buy new tapes when we need them. So they'll bulk erase and reuse. Tapes with ten or more passes on them are the most unreliable. Dropout after dropout. Ruins a lot of good stuff.
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#5 Brian Wells

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Posted 09 June 2005 - 12:34 AM

For as much as we love the archivability of film, what is there in the way of long term sound archive? DAT's are succeptable to the same short life span, aren't they??

I guess if you've got a print of your final project then you'd be safe...

Just curious.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 08:07 AM

For as much as we love the archivability of film, what is there in the way of long term sound archive?  DAT's are succeptable to the same short life span, aren't they??

I guess if you've got a print of your final project then you'd be safe...

Just curious.
Brian

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Optical sound negatives on polyester base are usually archival elements for a feature film.
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 12:26 PM

This is why I like to finish all of my projects on film, whatever the final distribution medium is. It's really scary to think that, since 1996, not a single television series has finished on film. Granted, they have the negative in archival storage somewhere, but in the event of the tape going kerplunk, the effects, sound, titles, wipes, everything will have to be redone or else the episode will be lost. Of course, they aren't storing the master tapes in someone's basement, but tape has always been at best a medium-term storage medium (guaranteed for about 10 years). I hope people in charge of these vaults are smart and have multiple copies and regular quality checks on their tapes to ensure that nothing is lost.

Regards.
~Karl Borowski
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#8 Richard Boddington

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Posted 10 June 2005 - 01:07 PM

"The good news was that the re-transfer of the original prints on a digital telecine to digiBeta was superb! great colour and sharp as a tack."

Don't post this in the HD forum you'll set off WWIII :D

You mean HD Cam won't be any good 10 years from now?

R,
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Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

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Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS