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Popping the white core back in :(


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#1 Dominik Muench

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 05:47 AM

I shot 6 400" rolls of 16mm stock over the weekend, and it was the first time i used a magazine with one of those clip cores. whata frustration for me, i didnt get the white core back in the film during unloading. why cant they simply make more magazines where you can put a white core in the takeup side ? :(
anyone got a tip how to do that easily without making the film unroll in the bag ?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 06:35 AM

I shot 6 400" rolls of 16mm stock over the weekend, and it was the first time i used a magazine with one of those clip cores. whata  frustration for me, i didnt get the white core back in the film during unloading. why cant they simply make more magazines where you can put a white core in the takeup side ? :(
anyone got a tip how to do that easily without making the film unroll in the bag ?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



If you can't do it easily, ask your lab do it. (I am sure they would in any case)
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#3 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 06:38 AM

I am confused why do you need to put the core back in. If the film has been exposed it should be OK without the core. I heard the only reason to put the core back in is if you are going to have long time before you can get the neg dev'ed - like filming in Antartica etc - and you have to store the cans vertically (what reason?) and the film roll might bend if stored upright

I put the film in the black bag and reaseal the can and store film can flat - not on edge

thanks

Rolfe
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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 07:54 AM

There's absolutely no need to put the core back in. The roll will hold its' shape without it. Struggling in a changing bag to replace the core is likely to cause damage to the film. Anyone who has ever had a roll come unwound in the bag can testify as to how much fun it is :-(

Edited by Stuart Brereton, 08 June 2005 - 07:55 AM.

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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 09:00 AM

There's absolutely no need to put the core back in. The roll will hold its' shape without it. Struggling in a changing bag to replace the core is likely to cause damage to the film. Anyone who has ever had a roll come unwound in the bag can testify as to how much fun it is :-(

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi,

Perhaps Dominic Case can comment? My understanding is that the film may get stressed or more dirty if no core is in place when loaded into the processing machine. I was taught to remove the core which I did for 20 years, until I read a thread on CML.

Stephen Williams DoP
Zurich

www.stephenw.com
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#6 Patrick Neary

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 10:37 AM

the few times i've had that happen, we just send a note to the lab on the camera report, it's never been a problem. (what's worse is accidentally sending your collapsible core to the lab!)

Edited by PatrickNeary, 08 June 2005 - 10:38 AM.

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#7 Danish Puthan Valiyandi

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 12:20 PM

If you use a collapsible core- then why will you need a white core again?

According to Arri SR2 and 3 cameras, they wind the film pretty tight.
When I unload them, I just use the old duct tape that was used before when
the film was unexposed to fix the film at the end, put it back to the black cover,
back to the tin.
I never experienced film getting unwinded from itself this way.

Greets,
Dan
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#8 Rik Andino

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 03:08 PM

I know what you're talking about...D. Muench

That's one of the aspect I dislike about Arri Cameras...
And that's another reason (if I'm a loader) I like working with Aatons...
(They don't use collaspisble cores)

The best way to solve this is to buy a few core adapters for your kit...
But they can be a bit costly...I think they're about $100US new...
But you can probably find them on ebay for around $20US...
There's always some selling Arri spare parts on ebay.

Anyways just buy two or three and have them in your AC kit...
So the next time you work with an Arri Camera with collaspible cores...
Just swap them out for your core adapters...
(But never forget to take your them back at the end of the shoot...)

Anyways good luck
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#9 Sam Wells

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 03:16 PM

I don't like the collapsibles; I'd get a core adaptor from Arri.

I'd mark the can & report NO CORE. (I'm paraniod and it's paid off...)

-Sam
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#10 Dominik Muench

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Posted 08 June 2005 - 06:39 PM

actually it was the guy at ATLAb GoldCoast who said the core should be in, and that it is an industry standard to put the white core back in when unloading the film. but ive never done it before, so i was confused.
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