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Lighting a small hotel interior (Night)

hotel interior lighting horror student short film

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#1 Rujikorn Sae Low

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 12:01 PM

I need some suggestions on how to light up this scene. (This scene will take place during nighttime)

We will have some wide shots and a Over-the -shoulder shot between the receptionist (who will be sitting) and the guest. We want it to be warm and inviting. Maybe add more lamps? Blue gels to fake moonlight? 

 

Im sorry I took these during daytime.

Wide 

 

GIhGhnV.jpg

 

Reception Area - The main area

 

5uPoDoF.jpg

 

We have access to some dedo lights,LED,Arri (300,800) and KinoFlos (4 Banks)

 

I really want to thank you in advance. :)


Edited by Rujikorn Sae Low, 13 June 2016 - 12:02 PM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 01:10 PM

Paper lanterns...
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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 02:13 PM

I'd go back to the location at night, and see what the existing lighting looks like. Take some stills on a dSLR that's setup the same as your movie camera, and see what it looks like as is. Then you can make decisions on what extra lighting you think you'll need.

 

Keep it simple. Try to let the practicals do the work for you, and only add lamps where necessary. The temptation is often to overlight, when perhaps just some low-level fill or backlight is all that's needed.


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#4 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 06:13 PM

Definitely think about adding more tungsten practicals - floor lamps and table lamps with light colored shades. A prime spot would be where that potted plant is in the middle of the lobby. Then a large soft tungsten key light for the scene at the reception desk. Maybe set the camera's white balance to 4300K so the tungsten goes warmer.

It might also be good to add a large soft tungsten toplight for extra ambience. Maybe a few Lekos or Parcans on the balcony punched into the ceiling if it's white?
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#5 Rujikorn Sae Low

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 10:04 PM

Paper lanterns...


Thank you David! How would you use the paper lantern in that scene? Will you use it as a global lighting or key light for actors? :)
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#6 Rujikorn Sae Low

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 10:09 PM

I'd go back to the location at night, and see what the existing lighting looks like. Take some stills on a dSLR that's setup the same as your movie camera, and see what it looks like as is. Then you can make decisions on what extra lighting you think you'll need.
 
Keep it simple. Try to let the practicals do the work for you, and only add lamps where necessary. The temptation is often to overlight, when perhaps just some low-level fill or backlight is all that's needed.


Okay. I will do just that. And you're right about the temptation to overlight. Gotta keep it simple. Thank you Stuart!
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#7 Rujikorn Sae Low

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 10:39 PM

Definitely think about adding more tungsten practicals - floor lamps and table lamps with light colored shades. A prime spot would be where that potted plant is in the middle of the lobby. Then a large soft tungsten key light for the scene at the reception desk. Maybe set the camera's white balance to 4300K so the tungsten goes warmer.

It might also be good to add a large soft tungsten toplight for extra ambience. Maybe a few Lekos or Parcans on the balcony punched into the ceiling if it's white?


That's a perfect spot! Extra ambience might be good ! Thank you ;)
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#8 Jared Bedrejo

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 11:58 PM

Back to what David said, it reminded me of this.

 

 

 

Screen_Shot_2016_06_13_at_9_50_20_PM.png

 

Now obviously there is a pretty big source directly above and probably a couple other things, but surrounding the area with china balls could probably be a good start in a smaller location. 


Edited by Jared Bedrejo, 13 June 2016 - 11:59 PM.

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#9 JD Hartman

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Posted 14 June 2016 - 05:58 AM

Lobby looks to be two stories tall.  It helps when location photos also include the upper walls and ceilings.  Will the camera ever face he entrance?  Have you given any thought to the need to light at least part of the exterior?  Otherwise in any shot in that direction, the door and upper windows will appear to be just a black hole.


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#10 Rujikorn Sae Low

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Posted 14 June 2016 - 07:26 AM

Lobby looks to be two stories tall.  It helps when location photos also include the upper walls and ceilings.  Will the camera ever face he entrance?  Have you given any thought to the need to light at least part of the exterior?  Otherwise in any shot in that direction, the door and upper windows will appear to be just a black hole.


The exterior that you see is the swimming pool area. We might use the pool to bounce the light. We won't see the entrance. :)

Edited by Rujikorn Sae Low, 14 June 2016 - 07:28 AM.

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