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Nizo 561 Macro meter question

7203 super 8

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#1 Chris Burke

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 05:52 AM

So my meter stopped working temporarily during a shoot. Shooting a band outside under a tent in shade. I was using a Nizo 561 Macro. All was working earlier in the day. When it happend, the meter didn't register anything as if the meter battery died. I could not stop so I decided to keep shooting for a few more minutes before switching cameras. My choice for doing that was, it would have taking longer to switch (no assistant) cams than take the risk of shooting. In such a case does the aperture default to open? Closed? Last ƒ stop used?? I was in auto mode shooting 7203. Should I push one stop? Am I buggered?  Lots of shade.  

 

 

Later, I removed batteries and reinstall and all works  one hundred percent. 


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#2 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 07:58 PM

Did you notice what setting the viewfinder needle was at?  The needle display is physically connected to the aperture vanes of the lens, which are driven by the light meter mechanism.    So if you can recall, whatever it was set at in the viewfinder is where the lens setting would be.   Without power, the mechanism defaults normally back to full open.  However, if something went wrong, it could sit at a given setting.  Another way would've been to look thru the film gate and run the camera after removing the film as you could see if the aperture vanes were partially closed or fully open.  But you remove the batteries and all is working now, so you won't know.   Usually, the aperture will open if power failed it, but, the battery would have to be dead...even some slight power could cause it to remain in a given position.  If you can't remember, I would guess that it may have gone back to full open, so would just go ahead and have the film processed normally.  If you can remember the setting, factor that into what the exposure should be for the shoot, and have the film processing adjusted if possible. Otherwise, and more realistically, you're stuck with what you got.  Good luck!


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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 08:58 PM

I think it was wide open. The footage came out great. Here is a still.
 699s8_1.46.1 copy.jpg
 


Edited by Chris Burke, 28 July 2016 - 09:12 PM.

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#4 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 03:31 PM

Nice still- did you try your meter with fresh batteries yet?


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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 07:26 AM

Not yet. I took them out and cleaned everything. Working now. The 7203 is fantastic. Not as sharp as the 13 but really great all it's own.
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#6 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 07:50 PM

Not yet. I took them out and cleaned everything. Working now. The 7203 is fantastic. Not as sharp as the 13 but really great all it's own.

Every once and a while the meter will go out on my Nizo 481 Macro... but comes back into play if I give the left side of the camera a couple of light taps. 


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