Jump to content




Photo

Right Lens for a human subjective


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Duca Simon Luchini

Duca Simon Luchini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Director

Posted 24 June 2016 - 01:36 AM

Hi everybody,

which kind of lens do you suggest to use for a "Normal" human view (Subjective)?

I read the huamn Angle of view is pretty 120 degrees but a lenses with this AOV are very wide angle... as 24, 16, 8mm! They distort images and it doesn't happen in a normal eyes view. Practically, I have seen that with a 35mm you can provide to give a credible human view, maybe also with a 40, 45, 50mm. 

What are your experience about? Shortly, if you have to shoot a subjective, which kind al lens do you use?

ATTENTION: I mean a "normal" human subjective,  without any creative or emotional functions!

 

Many thanks for a reply!


  • 0




#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 18789 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 24 June 2016 - 10:40 AM

There is rarely a reason to shoot a shot that has no creative or emotional nor storytelling functions, all of which will affect your choice of focal length.

 

But as you said, human vision, due to peripheral vision, has a very wide-angle view and yet a 35mm-ish focal length on a 35mm movie camera (or APS-C digital still camera) is close to what is considered a "normal" lens that neither compresses or expands perspective -- if you set up the camera on a tripod and looked through the viewfinder and then with your own eyes, the objects in front of you would look similar in size, distance, and perspective.

 

A lot of this difference between the wide view of human vision and the less wide-angle focal length of normal lenses is due to the size of most images on a screen, the fact that film images have a border and we look at them far enough away to see the border.

 

An example to show this is IMAX.  Often IMAX photography is done with wider-angle lenses but you usually sit close enough to the screen that the borders start to go outside to the edges of your vision and you essentially concentrate on a smaller portion in the lower center of the screen -- so in essence, your eyes are "cropping" a wide-angle image into a more normal focal length, so the wide-angle photography doesn't "feel" wide-angle.  But sit in the back row or look at a frame from a true IMAX movie on your computer, and it often looks very wide-angle.

 

But since most of us don't shoot for giant projection, we have to decide whether to match the wider view of human vision using shorter focal lengths, or the perspective and natural subject size using closer to normal focal lengths, or the way the human eye-brain picks out a detail from a distant subject using a zoom or telephoto lens -- in other words, it's a creative, emotional, storytelling decision.


  • 0

#3 Duca Simon Luchini

Duca Simon Luchini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Director

Posted 25 June 2016 - 01:54 AM

Okay David,

I understand. Of course is always  a creative, emotional, storytelling decision. I wanted only to have a starting point of reference (35mm / 40mm).

Many thanks, you are extreme exhaustive. :)


  • 0

#4 Shawn Sagady

Shawn Sagady
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Maryland

Posted 25 June 2016 - 03:39 AM

I think the generally accepted lenses are Full Frame: 50mm, Super 35: 35mm, Super 16: 18mm or so.


  • 0


CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

CineTape

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Zylight

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Pro 8mm

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Pro 8mm

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Zylight

The Slider

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post