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How to achieve this flash effect


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#1 Daniel Meier

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 11:51 AM

 

At 00:10, 00:13, 00:19

 

I often see these flashes when watching stuff shot on film. To me it seems like they cranked down the FPS or Shutter Angle while shooting.

Am I right with this? Or is this effect created during processing or in the DI?


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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 11:55 AM

Those are flash frames, caused by briefly cutting the camera and then rolling again. As the film transport slows down, it causes the last few frames of the shot to become over-exposed and undercranked, causing the effect you see. It can also be emulated as a post effect.

 

At the risk of sounding pedantic, a DI is a Digital Intermediate, which is a different process to digital color correction


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#3 Daniel Meier

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 12:23 PM

Thanks for the answer. By "DI" I meant any kind of digital post processing.

 

Do film cameras always slow down their film transport after recording is stopped?

Meaning that a hard cut can only be achieved in post?

Or is this just occuring if you continue recording very quickly after stopping?


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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 12:40 PM

Thanks for the answer. By "DI" I meant any kind of digital post processing.

'DI' is often used liked that, but it's an incorrect usage, as it only refers to a specific process.

 

 

Do film cameras always slow down their film transport after recording is stopped?

 

The effect is more pronounced on 35mm cameras than on 16mm as it takes longer for them to get up to speed, and to slow down. If they started and stopped instantaneously, it would place a lot of strain on the film and on the movement, due to the inertia of the roll itself.


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#5 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 01:36 PM

Do film cameras always slow down their film transport after recording is stopped?
Meaning that a hard cut can only be achieved in post?


Most professional 16mm and 35mm cameras do, but a lot of a super8 and 16mm amateur cameras do not. For example, the Bolex and Canon Scoopic don't slow down before cutting and rolling or create a flash frame because they don't have a mirror shutter. Instead they use a beam splitter prism to redirect the light from the lens to the film and viewfinder simultaneously. So there are no large moving parts in such a camera that need to reduce inertia before coming to rest, just the film movement which is like a sewing machine and can start and stop on a dime.

So it is possible to shoot a scene and edit in-camera with non-reflex camera, I've done it many times. I never saw flash frames until I started working with mirror shutter Arri and Aaton cameras.
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