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Film stock durability in camera


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#1 Daniel Meier

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 12:18 PM

I'm going to order some fresh Super8 cartridges of Vison3 50D and 200T stock.

As the pricing is really high, I thought of shooting very carefully and rarely using one cartridge for about 6 to 12 months.

To get as much different shots and locations on one stock.

 

Is it possible to keep the stock in the camera for that long, halfway exposed but not developed?

What do I have to regard in terms of physical stress, temperature changes, storage of the camera?

 

 


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#2 Jay Young

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 01:24 PM

Possible, yes.

Good idea?  Not really.

 

Best solution, maybe put the whole camera in the refrigerator?  Also not a good idea.

 

Of course you'll have to seriously watch for condensation issues.


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#3 Heikki Repo

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 01:44 PM

The exposed (latent) image is going to start to deteriorate immediately after exposure. With color film the best thing is to try to have it processed the same week, after three months the deterioration already affects how grainy it looks.

 

On the other hand, something like that can be done. For example, here is some 16mm footage that sat for 3½ years (!) before being processed (I think my friend did keep it in the fridge though): Please do note that with super-8 the effects of deterioration are going to be easier to spot.


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#4 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 08:25 PM

If it's a project that requires great consistencey between the sequences you are shooting, then common sense tells you that you are introducing risk. For people to answer well you need to give some idea of what the project is. Whether consistencey is a critical feature.

Aside from the consistencey issue...
Exposed stock has sometimes been left undeveloped for longish periods, and was ok. Fitzcalderado exposed stock spent months in the can I heard in hot humid conditions and was fine. Maybe that was back in the 100ASA tungsten days, so a different stock.

I don't see any problem with putting the loaded camera in the refridgerator, on proviso that you seal it from moisture. A good zip lock bag would do it. But you need to allow time for the camera and film to regain room temperature after leaving the fridge. And I would try to have all very dry before entering the fridge, mabe a big descicant pack in the bag with the cam for a while first.

You could always test one. Taking the camera and film through the process, before you spend time on anything that really matters.
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#5 Daniel Meier

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 09:53 AM

No consistency needed. It's not going to be for one project. Just some cutaway, B-Roll shots.
Your answers made me decide to not leave the film stock in camera for more than three months. That should be a good compromise.
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#6 Mark Dunn

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 02:07 PM

Why not just refrigerate the cartridge on its own, having made a note of the footage shot?


Edited by Mark Dunn, 15 July 2016 - 02:08 PM.

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#7 aapo lettinen

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 04:33 PM

couple of months in warm conditions is definitely going to show in the final image. whether it matters or not depends on the project and shooting style. 

I would refrigerate the partially shot cartridge on its own as Mark suggested.

 

I personally process the shot material at intervals of about 3 - 4 months and never had any problems with it. 

I keep the shot stock refrigerated and it is rarely in the camera for more than from 1 day to one week if shooting doc stuff and 1 hour to 1 day for other stuff.

I would not recommend 3 months in camera even with the 50D (I don't do that even with 35mm 5203) unless you are going to shoot at regular short intervals which makes refrigerating unpractical, for example one shot every day for 3 months.

 

Maybe would first store it in a plastic bag with silica gel pads for some time if it was partially shot in humid conditions and you are worrying about condensation/mold growth.

it is gelatin after all, microbes love it if given a chance  <_<


Edited by aapo lettinen, 16 July 2016 - 04:36 PM.

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#8 Daniel Meier

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 03:11 PM

Thanks for all your answers.

 

I'm going on a trip to Copenhagen for one week. There I'll be shooting the majority of the footage. After that I need the film to be in the camera let's say once a week for about 4 - 5 hours.

 

What do I have to consider if taking the cartridge out of the fridge? Just leave it in my room for 10 minutes and then take it out of the bag?


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#9 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 03:36 PM

With 16mm, I believe the rule of thumb was to defrost for a whole day, when going from freezer to fridge. And then at least 1hr when going from fridge to room temp. Maybe you can get away with less in Super 8.

I think it makes sense to pull the cartridge from the fridge when you get up in the morning or make breakfast, so that by the time you're ready to leave the house the condensation on the film has had time to dissipate.
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#10 aapo lettinen

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 04:56 PM

1.5 or 2 hours should be ok, I would use the same time than with 16mm. If you are starting really early in the morning it might be best to take it out to warm up late in the evening just before going to bed so you are ready to shoot right away when you wake up


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