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Lighting and Filming Lenticular Prints


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#1 Timothy Cooper

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 05:58 AM

Hi All,

 

First post; apologies for any etiquette errors in advance. I'm study anthropology and am making a documentary on some of my findings. I need to film the movement of a lenticular print. (These are the 2D print images made with interlocking layers that give the illusion of movement or three-dimensionality when you tilt them). In the most professional-looking way possible I need to film the completion of their short animated segment but am having huge problems working out how to light this, as well as how to achieve the gentle tilt required by either the camera or the print itself.

 

For example, this is a lenticular print: http://3dprinthq.com...ple-300x205.jpg

 

Any help you could give would really be extremely appreciated. 

Thanks in advance for your input!


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:02 AM

Maybe use a short camera slider?


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#3 Timothy Cooper

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:06 AM

Thanks for your response! That's a fine idea. The surface of these images are incredibly reflective though. Any tips on lighting the surface effectively? (I'm rather a beginner)


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:29 AM

I'd start by cross lighting them from the sides and then move the lights around until the hot spot is less annoying.  I don't know if a Pola filter screws up the lenticular effect.


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#5 Timothy Cooper

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:32 AM

This is wonderful, thanks ever so much for your input.


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#6 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:33 AM

Angle of incidence = angle of reflection. 

 

So, make sure your light is angled such that it won't reflect back into the lens. The lenticules make that harder, because it's not a flat surface, but it should be doable, especially if you light from one of the long ends of the lenticules. I'd start by lighting from where the camera is, at a lowish angle, away from the lens. If you're shooting this in a copystand type of arrangement, then it should be even easier. 

 

Also, a polarizing filter should help cut the reflection down if that doesn't work.


Edited by Perry Paolantonio, 09 August 2016 - 11:38 AM.

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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:36 AM

If the ridges run vertically, maybe the two lights should be from above and below, not from the sides...


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