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How to calibrate a Richter R2 AutoCollimator? ..& collimating collimator lenses?!


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#1 Nicolas Lastschenko

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Posted 12 August 2016 - 03:29 PM

Hello all,

I have recently moved to the other side of the world and upon unpacking my things and setting up my Richter test bench - I noticed the small screw holding the reticle of my R2 autocollimator had loosened and that the reticle had slid out the barrel where it usually is. I put the reticle back in its place but am not sure of its exact positioning? moving it forward or backwards must obviously affect infinity. ..so basically - how do you calibrate an r2 autocollimator?

I also recently purchased two richter lenses to add to my kit - obviously i am having issues with the reticle (see above) - but assuming i get the issue resolved soon - can the collimator lenses be in need of collimation themselves? ..and if so, after checking how compensate for any discrepancy? do you need to move the lenses only glass forward or back? or do you simply have to mark how far down the thread you have to screw them into their respective c-mount?

I appreciate any feedback and help as to how to resolve this issue. Thanks in advance.  


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#2 Nicolas Lastschenko

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 12:42 PM

..Anybody?!


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#3 Alex Nelson

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Posted 16 August 2016 - 06:08 PM

The quick and dirty way to check if the reticle is in its place is to mount one of the collimator objectives on the eyepiece and point it at a mirror while looking through (as though collimating a lens). Assuming the objective is properly calibrated, the reticle should look sharp in the eyepiece. If it isn't, then you have to determine whether the other objectives have the same problem. If they all look soft, then the reticle probably needs to be adjusted. If some are sharp and others aren't, then you need to decide which variables to start eliminating.


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#4 Nicolas Lastschenko

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 11:21 AM

Hey Alex,

Thanks for the reply. ..mount a collimator objective on the eyepiece? ..Do you mean to connect the eyepiece to the back (light source) of the R2 and mount the objective in its regular lens port? ..and then look into a mirror. (think i've either read or heard that before)


 


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#5 Alex Nelson

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 10:25 AM

I apologize, my original instructions were not terribly clear. I have an LED flashlight on my Richter, so I was envisioning taking the whole autocollimator assembly (light source, eyepiece, and objective) into, say, a bathroom and pointing the whole thing at a mirror. The more reasonable method would be to just get a small hand mirror and place it in front of the objective without taking the whole thing off the rails. The rest of the process is the same.


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#6 Nicolas Lastschenko

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 05:05 PM

Hey again Alex,

Thanks a lot for that. Am away on shoots these next few days. Sure to try this as soon as I get back.  
..as I, kind of' alluded too above; I have also heard something about mounting the eyepiece to the light source "socket" and looking at the moon or something as such - know anything about that?

Thanks again. Will post back with what happens.


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#7 Alex Nelson

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Posted 23 August 2016 - 10:47 AM

Pointing the eyepiece assembly at something like the moon will tell you if the objective/eyepiece are properly calibrated, but placing a mirror in front of the whole thing with the light source turned on will also tell you if your reticle is calibrated as well.


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