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Teaching Aids


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#1 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 17 August 2016 - 02:15 AM

Hey guys,

So as many of you know, I've been teaching basic filmmaking courses on 16 for the last year and it's been going great, though I will admit very slow. I just started working at LACHSA, which is the high school for arts here in East Los Angeles. It's a great opportunity for me because I will be teaching film production for the seniors. Everyone who graduates, must go through my class, which means I have to do a good job.

My goal is to teach very much hands on. I want the kids to touch every inch of everything we do. It's a photochemical class only, so everything will be shot on film starting with 16 and eventually 35. We will be cutting print and even doing negative cutting, in class. Students will be exposed to every facet and eventually, my hopes are to even process B&W reversal at school, if they permit me. This way they have a better understanding of the photochemical process.

Needless to say, what I want to accomplish requires more then I can achieve personally. This is why I'm here seeking not only advice, but also if anyone can help provide some cool teaching aids.

What I'd love to do is show the spinning mirror shutter/pulldown assembly and how it works as a physical demonstrating model. This would require finding/buying a camera that has no value, but has easy access to the movement for educational purposes. Obviously 35mm would be the best for this since it's so big.

Of course, I would like other ideas of teaching aids, stuff that maybe you've seen in the past that worked well, which is easy to access.

Let me know what you think! Fun days are ahead and I can't wait to report back when we start in two weeks! :)
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#2 JD Hartman

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 10:27 AM

Don't have an answer, instead two questions.

1) What happens to cameras that are totally wrecked or otherwise deemed not economical to repair?  Does a rental house take the insurance check and trash the remains?  Maybe a possible source for a mechanism?

 

2) Could the basics of the mechanism be recreated in wood,metal or a combination?   I've seen entire clocks, gears and escarpment mechanism made of wood.


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#3 Michael Rodin

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 03:29 PM

With a mill and a lathe you can build a working camera movement. It's not that complicated unless you try to make it precise & eficient (and get into twin-cam designs, registration pins, adjustable parts et cetera) or, worse, silent - which is a whole engineering problem. But buying an old beaten up 35mm MOS camera might be cheaper.


Edited by Michael Rodin, 21 August 2016 - 03:32 PM.

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#4 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 10:33 PM

Thanks guys. Yea I'm thinking of an old beat up MOS camera. There are a few Russian cameras on ebay which aren't too much money, worth looking into for sure. I was just wondering if someone owned something they were willing to donate or sell for not much. 


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