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VERY QUICK EASY QUESTION


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#1 Ckulakov

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 12:32 PM

If I am shooting on a overcast day in the afternoon with a subject on a outside porch with no sky in the frame what type of filter will make it look like its a beautifull sunny day?

AND is "velbon" a good company for tripods?

PLEASE AWNSER PLEASE
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#2 timHealy

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 01:01 PM

If I am shooting on a overcast day in the afternoon with a subject on a outside porch with no sky in the frame what type of filter will make it look like its a beautifull sunny day?

AND is "velbon" a good company for tripods?

PLEASE AWNSER PLEASE

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



There is no filter that makes something look sunny. You need some form of lighting for that to add a splash of light emulating the sun. It could be HMI's with half orange, or maybe tungsten par's with no correction or half blue correction for example. If the sun is out and not hitting the porch it may look similiar to an overcast day period as overhead daylight is similiar to overhead overcast except brighter and a little different in color. If the sun is out and not hitting the porch you may be able to use mirrors depending on your camera angles and where the sun is.

You may try and catch some bounce from the day light with a 12 x 12 or a 12 x12 gold lame somewhere off the porch but that may be like squeezing blood from stone. Good luck.

Edited by heel_e, 12 June 2005 - 01:03 PM.

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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 01:10 PM

There is NO filter that will make an overcast day look sunny. If there was, it would sell in huge quantities here in the UK ;-)

Sunny days are high contrast. Overcast days are not. You're filming on a porch, right? Try to pick your angles so that you can't see outside of the porch. If you have access to lights, then your best bet is to get the biggest lamp you have and try to give your subject a nice hot rim or side light, as if the sun was shining in on them. If you don't have any big lights, then you could shoot tighter shots and use a smaller lamp.

If there is even a faint sun, you might try using a mirror to reflect it into the porch.

I have a Velbon tripod, but i only use it for stills photography. FWIW, it's well made, and comparatively cheap.
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#4 MiguelDelValle

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 01:39 PM

using those rim lights and maybe an 81ef istead of the 85 filter may help to give a warmer look overall.
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#5 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 02:28 PM

Velbon are ok, best I've used though are Manfrotto
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#6 drew_town

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 02:36 PM

Velbon tripods are cheap and flimsy.

Bogen Manfrotto and Gitzo tripods are pretty good and reasonably priced.

Vinten, Schatler, Miller, OConnor, Cartoni tripods are really good.

It really depends a lot on what camera you'll be using and what you'll be shooting.
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#7 Brian Wells

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 03:34 PM

If I am shooting on a overcast day in the afternoon with a subject on a outside porch with no sky in the frame what type of filter will make it look like its a beautifull sunny day?

AND is "velbon" a good company for tripods?

PLEASE AWNSER PLEASE

Patience my fellow student filmmaker! Everyone is right; a filter that would make things look sunny would be nothing short of a miracle! Given your experience level, I bet you're probably learning about high powered HMI daylight fixtures, and that CTO means "color temperature orange" and is a gelatin filter for lighting fixtures, and the effective use of grip equipment like silks and shiny boards and C-stands and that right now you probably lack access to any of those things. Which is OK, I didn't have that stuff when I was starting out, either.

My guess is you probably want warmer-looking video. For that, the Antique Suede 1 is a nice choice as is the Maui Brown 1. I own both and like them very much. An 85A or 85B are also both excellent for adding warmth to otherwise stale video images. I'm not sure what's available in the lens diameter of your camera, though. Of course, you could add some warmth using a basic color correction tool on the computer...

In the world of tripods, price ranges from $20 to over $14,000. Velbon is definitely at the lower end of the scale. For smoothe shots, you really must have a fluid-head. The least expensive kit I know of with a true fluid head would be the Bogen 503. With tripod legs, you should find one for around $500. Tripods from the Velbon brand are better suited to still photography where you don't need smoothe motion. A Velbon would work fine for "lockdowns" when the camera isn't in motion.

Hope this helps.
Good luck!
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#8 Tim J Durham

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 07:22 PM

There is NO filter that will make an overcast day look sunny. If there was, it would sell in huge quantities here in the UK ;-)

Sunny days are high contrast. Overcast days are not. You're filming on a porch, right? Try to pick your angles so that you can't see outside of the porch. If you have access to lights, then your best bet is to get the biggest lamp you have and try to give your subject a nice hot rim or side light, as if the sun was shining in on them. If you don't have any big lights, then you could shoot tighter shots and use a smaller lamp.

If there is even a faint sun, you might try using a mirror to reflect it into the porch.

I have a Velbon tripod, but i only use it for stills photography. FWIW, it's well made, and comparatively cheap.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'd go with a big, uncorrected tungsten light at the appropriate angle as a strong edge light. I'd also use something like a black frost or pro-mist filter on the lens and make sure the light was hitting some reflective surfaces. A couple glasses of iced tea for instance. The filter would give the highlights a glow that you'd visually associate with a sunny day. Lastly, it'll probably be dark under the porch overhang, so key with as big and soft a source as you can get and try to make it slightly blue (1/4 CTB frame in an HMI with a really big softbox), which is the way things are when in the shade on a sunny day.
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The Slider

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Glidecam

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