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Regular 8 editor viewer


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#1 mbaarviao

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 12:46 PM

Does anyone have or know this editor viewer?
I had read somewhere that is a solid and very good model, Bell & Howell quality (but made in Japan), but if anyone can confirm is better.   :)
It's for Regular 8, I already have a Goko dual format editor, but it's very old, and I found this B&H in a little market, in a very good state and at half of the cost which is generally sold on eBay.
Thank you.   :)

Edited by mbaarviao, 26 August 2016 - 12:47 PM.

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#2 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 10:33 PM

This Regular 8mm Editor Viewer was made by ELMO, and also sold under their own brand name.  It works fine, but uses a

chain inside which places a lot of torque on the mechanism, especially if you try to reverse wind the film to go back.  For 50ft

reels, it's okay, but anything longer, there's stress in it. Also, if you have any Regular 8mm film that is overwidth, it will bind trying to run thru this unit.  Overwidth film is due to uneven film slitting at the lab, which was more common than many people realized.

In the projector, the gate's side pressure spring will ride the film width and is more forgiving, but in this unit which is pretty

precision made, it will not. I speak from experience, mine just sits in my collection now.   You're much better off with a standard

design dedicated Regular 8mm only unit, such as those made by Craig Kalart, Minette, Warner, and others.   The Baia units can

be tricky, as they used a design whereby the film is in an emulsion down configuration and you have to twist the film to make

the splices.  They have large bright images, but unless the unit is immaculate, dust will have gunked up the rotating prisms units and make it difficult to pull film thru them. They are light weight and plastic, so if you use one of these, best to tape the winding arms down to the table top.  This goes for other units also, securing the outrigger winding arms helps keep the unit from moving

around on you.  Had to add this, if you decide to go for another unit.  The Dual 8mm units, even the GOKO ones, just put a bit

too much strain on the film, as the film sprockets rotate the prism units which are double wide to accommodate both gauges.

It's best to use a unit made only for that film type, that goes for 8mm or Super 8mm.   So many around these days and pretty

cheap too on eBay, since many no longer edit their film the old way; opting for digital transfer and do it in post.  For those of us

that still project film, (and what a treat that is!) film editing on an Editor Viewer is the way to go.


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#3 mbaarviao

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 02:52 AM

This Regular 8mm Editor Viewer was made by ELMO, and also sold under their own brand name.  It works fine, but uses a

chain inside which places a lot of torque on the mechanism, especially if you try to reverse wind the film to go back.  For 50ft

reels, it's okay, but anything longer, there's stress in it. Also, if you have any Regular 8mm film that is overwidth, it will bind trying to run thru this unit.  Overwidth film is due to uneven film slitting at the lab, which was more common than many people realized.

In the projector, the gate's side pressure spring will ride the film width and is more forgiving, but in this unit which is pretty

precision made, it will not. I speak from experience, mine just sits in my collection now.   You're much better off with a standard

design dedicated Regular 8mm only unit, such as those made by Craig Kalart, Minette, Warner, and others.   The Baia units can

be tricky, as they used a design whereby the film is in an emulsion down configuration and you have to twist the film to make

the splices.  They have large bright images, but unless the unit is immaculate, dust will have gunked up the rotating prisms units and make it difficult to pull film thru them. They are light weight and plastic, so if you use one of these, best to tape the winding arms down to the table top.  This goes for other units also, securing the outrigger winding arms helps keep the unit from moving

around on you.  Had to add this, if you decide to go for another unit.  The Dual 8mm units, even the GOKO ones, just put a bit

too much strain on the film, as the film sprockets rotate the prism units which are double wide to accommodate both gauges.

It's best to use a unit made only for that film type, that goes for 8mm or Super 8mm.   So many around these days and pretty

cheap too on eBay, since many no longer edit their film the old way; opting for digital transfer and do it in post.  For those of us

that still project film, (and what a treat that is!) film editing on an Editor Viewer is the way to go.

 
Excellent analysis, Martin!
Sometimes I found overwidth film, with sometimes "over screen" frame.
For years and years I have use various Goko dual format, who are good editors, but they have the problem that you said: you can not run fast the winding, otherwise going out of the sprocket. 
For Super 8 I am fine with a S-2 Minette, we know it has a small screen, but it is very clear and defined, and winding is very smooth, the film runs with real delicacy.
 
I wanted to ask you two things:
 
1) In the Bell & Howell posted above, this:
vintage-bell-howell-filmo-8mm-film-edito
for Regular 8, you say to me that there is also produced by Elmo (you have a photo of Elmo version?), where is the focus knob? I saw that for the frame adjustment must press the usual sporcket, but the focus??
 
2) Which model ONLY Regular 8 you recommend?
 
Thank you! :)

Edited by mbaarviao, 31 August 2016 - 02:57 AM.

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#4 mbaarviao

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 05:39 PM

Help for B&H editor viewer of superior posts.
 
1) Even if no one owns this editor, maybe you know where I can adjust the focus?
By unscrewing the lower compartment, one that is labeled Bell & Howell, there is a screw on the little lens, but does not cause almost no effect.
 
2) It seems to me that the shutter is completely out of sync! Does not display the image properly, rushing without being perceived, as when a film is not inserted precisely on the little teeth of a sprocket.

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#5 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 09:31 PM

I just checked out the ELMO version that I own, and it's a Dual 8mm configuration with switchable sprockets for both formats, and while they are similar, mine has a focus wheel on the lower cover's left side.  Some of these were fixed focus, as were many other Regular 8mm Editor Viewers.  As you surmised, focus adjustment would require some other physical adjustment.  As for the out-of-frame or sync, there is obviously something wrong or out of adjustment.  This is too involved to try to solve via a posting.  You would have to carefully make various adjustments to get it to work correctly.  I would just move on to a better stand alone type unit. Minette used to make Regular 8mm versions long ago, they rarely show up anywhere though.  Craig Kalart made heavy duty cast metal units that will last forever, and these show up on eBay from time to time, as do many other units.  You just have to hunt around. Avoid the all Bakelite unit with the tiny screen, it is the predecessor to the ELMO and B&H units, and just not fun to use. Atlas Warner made pretty good Regular 8mm units, but I only see a dual 8mm version on eBay.  At the moment, there are two MINETTE Reg 8mm units (labeled only as 8mm, since Super 8mm wasn't around yet) in the $50 to $60 range, plus shipping additional.  Otherwise, visit thrift shops, antique shops, junk shops, garage sales, or ask people in your extended family.  Lastly, you might just want to lubricate the mechanical rotating mechanism on your GOKO Dual 8mm unit.  You can use a good Silicone (one that will not harm plastic, read the label), as it won't harm the film.  Just be careful not to get any on the lenses, mirror areas. It won't harm them, but might make it difficult to view the image.  If you do, you could wipe it off or around with cotton swaps.  Pinion areas which have heavier torque on them would need a heavier lubricant such as some fine Lithium Grease.  Good luck!


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