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Film exposed at the beginning of the cartridge?


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#1 Jessie No

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 05:30 PM

Hi! I bought a Kodak cartridge and I was wondering...
When I put the cartridge in, since there's already a little lenght of film that is visible at the beginning of the reel and that therefore, that part of the film might be exposed... Should I shoot for a few seconds before actually filming what I have to film (to make sure it comes out the way I want it to)?
If so, how many seconds approximately?
Thank you!
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#2 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 10:21 PM

Running the Super 8mm cartrige for a couple seconds first is a good idea. The light stuck film, only goes

back into the cartridge barely an inch either way if that much.  The cartridge was designed for camera loading

in full daylight without fogging the film. However, the first few inches of film have a backward twist to it

owing to the film path in the cartridge, so it can take about a full second or two to run completely steady.  Those first few inches though are great to shoot a color chart, gray scale, or film slate, or do a focus check.  This steadiness would also apply to

a given cartridge if it has sat for an extended period of time prior to filming on it again, due to the torturous film path.


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#3 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 02:28 AM

So, expanding on Martin's explanations, one should run the cartridge in for 5 sec at 18 fps with the lens covered ("shooting black"). Then go back to 24 or 25 fps (or alternative filming speeds you want) and begin shooting what you want to. It's basically as you would do it on 16 or 35mm after swapping magazines.
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#4 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 02:52 AM

In general it has long been recommended to idle transport the film enough length such that the film which was in the sharp bend in the cartridge. I.e. half the height and the depth to the rear, some 15 centimeters.  When the film had been left standing still long enough the film would adopt a strong curve/bump around the sharp bend and go out off focus when this bump would be exposed at the gate position.


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