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H264 4K encode codec, DPX 16 bits TIFF 16 Bits


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#1 Frank Chang

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 11:10 AM

Is H264 a good encode codec to use for film4K or HD (1920x1080) render in AE for lossless or is there a better one to choose if I want the best video quality? Currently
H264 is generating about 750MB for the 15 minute feature. Currently I am trying to compose the scanned DPX 4K 16 bits 72 dpi files using DPX_Plus plug-In.
 
Just curious. I also have TIFF 16 bits files from the same scan. This is only a 15 minute feature. If I use TIFF instead of DPX, do I loose anything in terms of image quality, etc? (Note:The current DPX file does not contain audio data)
 
And finally, I noticed that the DPX raw scanned file were saved as (16 bits, packed, big-endian). However, when we did the color correction, etc, batch and resaved the DPX, the
file indicates as (16 bits, fill method, big-endian). Should I be worried about the "Fill Method" that was originally "Packed"? Are there any difference between the two? (Fill vs Packed)?
 
 
 
Thanks

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#2 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 12:10 PM

H.264 is only suitable for final delivery. I wouldn't use it for editing, or frankly anywhere in the post production pipeline with the exception of client approval files. While your files are smaller, that size comes at a hefty price - lots of compression (intra-frame), compromised color space, and an inter-frame compression scheme that makes editing pretty funky. 

 

If you need a file format that's easy to work with, make ProRes proxy files from your DPX sequences. In most cases, that will be good enough for final delivery (if you're in the HQ family of ProRes codecs), but if not, you could always relink the media later with your DPX files, assuming the software you're using supports that format. 

 

TIFF is not widely used in the film/video world. Some archives like it, but DPX is pretty much the standard. That said, working with 16bit DPX or TIFF files is madness. The files are tremendous and if you're coming from negative, you're not gaining anything over 10bit log. Those 16bit files are linear, both the TIFF and DPX. Stick with 10bit log DPX if you want an uncompressed RGB format, and you'll be fine.

 

-perry


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#3 Frank Chang

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 12:43 PM

Thanks, Perry. Sorry for the confusion. I am doing the actual corrections (i.e. color correction, etc) with DPX files directly.

The thing that I was not sure about were which formats to choose (as final delivery). Is H.264 a good final delivery format

for both 4K or 2K?

 

I understand that 16bit are linear. But as far as I understand, software don't care if it is 10 (Log) or 16 (Linear) (as long as it supports 16), right?

 

Are 10bit and 16bit both uncompressed RGB format, right? I know they are big files (each frame is 72.9MB)

 

 

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#4 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 02:05 PM

Delivery format should be based on what's required. We typically deliver files in 4-5 different formats (usually some kind of  uncompressed, ProRes or Avid DNxHR, and in different resolutions like 4k, HD, etc -- all depending on what the client requires). There's no one-size fits all delivery format, it should be based on what the next person in the post pipeline needs. If you're working in DPX at this point I wouldn't even worry too much about it, since there will always be a way to make it when you're done. If I had to choose a pretty universally acceptable containerized format, it'd most likely be ProRes, either 4444 or 422 HQ.

 

 

I understand that 16bit are linear. But as far as I understand, software don't care if it is 10 (Log) or 16 (Linear) (as long as it supports 16), right?

Not sure what you mean - 16bit files have less software support than 10bit, since 10bit files have been the industry standard for a long time and are much more economical in terms of file size and convenience. 16bit really is a pain to work with, and a lot of applications don't handle it. Those that do, require massive amounts of disk space and speed to do so...
 

 

Are 10bit and 16bit both uncompressed RGB format, right? I know they are big files (each frame is 72.9MB)

 

 

 
Not necessarily, but usually, at least when you're talking about DPX. You can have monochrome and YUV DPX files too...

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#5 Frank Chang

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 02:10 PM

Thanks, Perry.


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