Jump to content




Photo

Exposure, really confusing situation


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Mendes Nabil

Mendes Nabil

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Director
  • Paris

Posted 02 September 2016 - 03:34 AM

Hello guys, how are you?

 

 

I would like to know how do you manage this following "tricky" situation:

 

I have a Canon 1014 Autozoom electronic, for the exposure i point to the subject, see what the automatic mode suggests me and set it in manual mode, BUT.. Depending on the focal length the right exposure is different, what if you plan to zoom-in during the shoot?

 

Do you go for the widest or closest aperture? Do you set the exposure according to the short focal suggestion or long focal?

 

I'm waiting for a Super8 cartridge to come back from the lab, i hope i didn't messed things up.. (Color negative Vision 3 500t)

 

 

 

Thanks all!


  • 0




#2 Jay Young

Jay Young
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 380 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Lexington KY

Posted 02 September 2016 - 04:16 AM

Perhaps the right exposure changes because of the way the light meter works on the camera?  Like taking an incident reading, then switching to a spot meter?

 

Or does the maximum aperture change when zooming in?    


  • 0

#3 Michael Lehnert

Michael Lehnert
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1027 posts
  • Other
  • London, UK / Basel, CH

Posted 02 September 2016 - 07:11 AM

Both the Canon Auto Zoom 814 Electronic and Canon Auto Zoom 1014 Electronic use TTL exposure control, which means the internal lightmeter takes an average reading of the incoming light and selects the f-stop accordingly. The discrepancy you experience relates to the difference in light that is caught by the lens at the different focal lengths. It is indeed a bit like moving between a spotmeter (narrow light angle in tele) and a incident reading (wide light angle ambient). In fact, if you have a long focal length zoom lens, such as on the 1014, you can mimick taking spotmeter readings by using the tele – if you don't have a spotmeter at hand.

 

The decision on whether to go for the one f-stop suggested by the camera in tele, or the one suggested when in wide angle, depends on what you are filming. If the contrasts would too stark and the overall image to underexposed in wide, but spot on in tele, e.g. when zooming out of a shady olive grove into a tele of the bright sunlit Mediterranean sea (with lots of light reflection on the sea surface), then you may want to actually select an average value between the two extremes f-stops at either end. You can also pick one in a slightly weighted manner, so not just the mid-point f-stop, but rather weight it to retain some of the shade of the olive grove at the beginning, and overemphasise the glare of the sea in tele. Or vice versa. If you have f/22 and f/8, pick either f/16 or f/11, or an in-between between the two for a dead-on average, using the manual exposure control of the camera.

 

Now, I don't know what you were shooting, where, indoors or outdoors, with light set or merely available light, at what time of day in what light conditions, and above all what aesthetic you are actually after, if you used ND filters etc. etc. etc. But, in crude generality, as you are shooting with negative, and 7219 at that, you will find that the film stock has such latitude that you are unlikely to receive back totally overexposed or underexposed material during a travelling through the zoom range. Your concern was much more relevant during the low-sensitivity reversal film era, the Kodachrome nostalgia that some people still indulge in.

 

Don't forget, the 'art' in the art form of cinematography is to master the technical aspects, alright, and then override this technocratic rulebook with the intuitive feeling gained from shooting experience to get the right result you desire  :)


  • 1

#4 Nick Collingwood

Nick Collingwood
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Other
  • New York, NY

Posted 02 September 2016 - 12:06 PM

I think Michael covered a lot of it but I'll just say that in regards to the roll you shot, V3 has a crazy amount of latitude so I'm sure you'll get at least something out of it. I've shot 500T in a camera that over exposed it by 1 and 2/3 of a stop and gotten great results and shot 500T in a super dimly lit wedding reception and in a dim concert venue and gotten results although I did have them push those 1 stop in processing.

 

As far as your overall question, in short, I've only been shooting for about a year but I would generally say zoom in to focus then zoom out and meter at whatever focal length you actually want to shoot at (unless the lighting is really tricky). If you meter zoomed in then zoom out, the camera will be exposes for whatever it was you zoom in on which can be good (if it's a face for instance) or bad (if you zoomed in on a something bright to meter and the rest of the scene once zoomed out is dark or something like that).

 

Either way, Super 8 is forgiving and shooting film is about research (as in... google everything. So many forums out there like this one for instance with people who have probably shot with a similar setup). trial-and-error, and learning from that. Have fun with it! You'll get the hang of it.


  • 0

#5 Mendes Nabil

Mendes Nabil

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Director
  • Paris

Posted 06 September 2016 - 07:37 AM

A huge Thanks for your answers guys, and like you said, "We learn by doing", i can't wait to receive the processed film..

 

Thanks again and have a beautiful day!


  • 0


Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Pro 8mm

Zylight

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Technodolly

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Glidecam

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Pro 8mm

Tai Audio

Zylight

The Slider

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks