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Best Cinematography You've Seen In A Comedy?


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#21 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 12:14 PM

Gerald Hirschfeld has mentioned that after he finished the answer print for "Young Frankenstein", Mel Brooks told the lab to then print everything overall brighter.


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#22 George Ebersole

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 12:55 PM

An exceptionally well lit and well shot comedy is another family favorite; "Kiss me Goodbye".  It's a remake of a Brazilian film whose name I forget ... checking IMDb; Sally Field, James Caan, Jeff Bridges, a remake of "Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands"

 

Trailer for Kiss Me Goodbye;

 


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#23 joshua gallegos

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Posted 09 September 2016 - 09:38 PM

It's been a long time since I've seen that one but I recall it being very lovely.  Have you ever seen "Portrait of Jennie" (1948)? Lush b&w cinematography by Joseph August, ASC.  The shoot exhausted him (being a Selznick production) and he died right after he finished it.

 

I looked up the director, as I haven't seen the film and to my delight it was William Dieterle. I have seen a couple of his films: Devil & Daniel Webster, and The Hunchback of Notre Dame...


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#24 Tristan Noelle

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 02:48 PM

In the making of documentary on the "Young Frankenstein" DVD, Hirschfeld says he would light the wide shots very contrasty and dark to set the sense of place and mood for the scene, but for the close ups he'd fill them in more so the comedy would play better. Sort of a way to have your cake and eat it too I guess.

Apologies in advance for the digression, but because I have the book handy: "...because I was satirizing the look of the original Frankenstein, I asked the lab to develop the negative to about a 7.2 Gamma to better match the more contrasty negative used for the original. The increased development time (equivalent to forcing or pushing) gave me the desired degree of contrast and decreased the amount of light needed for the F/4.5 stop that was used to carry the depth of the larger castle sets." - Image Control, Gerald Hrischfeld, ASC, p. 74
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#25 John E Clark

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 03:36 PM

In the making of documentary on the "Young Frankenstein" DVD, Hirschfeld says he would light the wide shots very contrasty and dark to set the sense of place and mood for the scene, but for the close ups he'd fill them in more so the comedy would play better. Sort of a way to have your cake and eat it too I guess.

Apologies in advance for the digression, but because I have the book handy: "...because I was satirizing the look of the original Frankenstein, I asked the lab to develop the negative to about a 7.2 Gamma to better match the more contrasty negative used for the original. The increased development time (equivalent to forcing or pushing) gave me the desired degree of contrast and decreased the amount of light needed for the F/4.5 stop that was used to carry the depth of the larger castle sets." - Image Control, Gerald Hrischfeld, ASC, p. 74

 

So, it would seem that even in a comedy parody of a 'strong lighting' genre, the lighting is 'less strong' to support the comedic effect...


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#26 George Ebersole

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 06:51 AM

I wouldn't put too much stock in that.  The sets were dimly lit, but the characters still had strong lighting.  And that's in keeping with the "floodlight" theory of lighting of certain comedies.  Usually those aimed at the teen demographic.  

 

When the post-teen audience was the primary focus, pre 80s and pre 90s, you still threw a lot of light on the subjects but only because the film stock at the time had a lower ASA.  

 

Maybe I'm showing my age, but I've not seen a good contemporary comedy in over two decades.  "Our Idiot Brother" was fairly well shot and lit, and it looked like a good adult comedy, but even then it kind of fell flat in my opinion.


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#27 Marcel Zyskind

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Posted 12 September 2016 - 08:14 PM

Manhattan and Sideways! Mostly because they are two of my favourite films. 


Edited by Marcel Zyskind, 12 September 2016 - 08:14 PM.

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#28 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 09:14 AM

 

Maybe I'm showing my age, but I've not seen a good contemporary comedy in over two decades.  "Our Idiot Brother" was fairly well shot and lit, and it looked like a good adult comedy, but even then it kind of fell flat in my opinion.

 


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#29 George Ebersole

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 06:54 PM

Okay ..... okay ..... okay, I'll admit it.  that trailer was funny.

 

BUT, I hope I won't see any groin kicking or fart jokes in this thing ... I mean it!  

 

I'm kind of talking tongue in cheek here, but I'm also somewhat serious.  I've not seen a good comedy that that had maybe one or two swear words and didn't rely on body function / groin kicking humor in ... what now, 20 years or more?

 

The 1970s was like the last gasp of clean humor that was actually funny, with maybe a swear word or two tossed in.  In the 1980s and sorta kinda late 1970s, "things were bulging at the seams", so to speak for mainstream humor.  Vegas / Nightshow "dirty" humor was creeping into movies until it just exploded in the 80s.  Then in the 90s it's like funny movies weren't funny anymore, a few gems here and there ...

 

So, you've shown me this.  And my hopes are stirred, though not rekindled.  I'm going to watch this with an open mind.  

 

Sorry for the rant.  But I'm an old school clean humor for the masses kind of guy.  It's not that I don't appreciate blue humor, but there was a time when you could take a kid to a film aimed at adults and not have to worry about him being exposed to stuff you didn't want him exposed to.  

 

So, I'm going to stream this ... but first I need to head out to the coast and grab some footage   :)


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#30 John E Clark

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 07:51 PM

I have no problem with 'fart jokes' or other 'low grade humor'... heck "Blazing Saddles"(1974) blazed through a number of 'low' humor points.

 

I do think political humor or satire such as found in "The Groove Tube"(1974) (filled with any number of scatological or sexual based humor points...) is severely lacking in the modern times...

 

And yes I'd take my daughter to most R shows these days... ok... were she 12 again... but the way we did things when she was young was we would go to film A and she would go to film B if she didn't want to see A... this only happened with "Dracula"(1992)...


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#31 George Ebersole

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 10:13 PM

Well, just to clarify, I hated the 70s.  All kinds of reasons.  But movies then were largely aimed at a post-college audience, and those films were smarter for it.  "California Suite", "The Goodbye Girl", even films that had elements of humor in them like "Close Encounters" or "Death on the Nile" which were of other genres, were, in my not so humble opinion, better films.

 

Popular humor today is fairly.  Things like "The Groove Tube" have been around forever.  But gags like a guy getting "his junk" caught in his pants zipper in "Something About Mary", to me, is not only not funny, but it's obvious humor that isn't that humorous to begin with.

 

Compare that toi "9 to 5" with Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda and Dolly Parton, and you find tons of sexual humor, but it isn't crass like today's films.  Just my personal gripe.

 

Another example, before "Scary Movie" and its sequels, and a few knockoffs, there was a little no-budget / lowbudget film called "Student Bodies".  It's got a few crass bathroom humor jokes, but they don't call attention to themselves too much ... except for Malvert and the punch bowl gag ... no spoilers here  :)

 

Just my opinion.  I guess I'm just too old to appreciate modern humor ... but how is it I find older classic era comedies good and not newer films?  Just me, I guess.  Sorry for derailing the thread.  Many apologies.


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#32 Ravi Kiran

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 10:51 PM

"Keanu" had some pretty good cinematography.

 

If we're also including TV, "Man Seeking Woman" is well shot. It's not the usual brightly-lit comedy. It traverses a lot of cinematic styles (drama, horror, etc.) for comedic effect. Same for "Key and Peele" (directed by "Keanu" director Peter Atencio, though I don't think DP Jas Shelton worked on the show).


Edited by Ravi Kiran, 13 September 2016 - 10:54 PM.

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#33 George Ebersole

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 10:52 PM

All right, tried watching it, and it's pretty disgusting stuff.  My rant continues.

 

p.s. Michael, that's not clean comedy.  Someone getting caught in a woodchipper and his guts being flayed at some blonde is the exact thing I was raging against.  Pretty pornographic violence in my book.  Addendum; it's down right sick and twisted.  I can't imagine anyone in their right mind laughing at this crap.  I'm sorry I praised the trailer.  I feel like a real fool.


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#34 JD Hartman

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 05:39 AM


 

Sorry for the rant.  But I'm an old school clean humor for the masses kind of guy.  It's not that I don't appreciate blue humor, but there was a time when you could take a kid to a film aimed at adults and not have to worry about him being exposed to stuff you didn't want him exposed to.  

 

 

Better not watch Sausage Party then.......


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#35 KH Martin

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 07:27 AM

Two extremes in terms of approach to come to mind, each appropriate to that film: LOCAL HERO and DR STRANGELOVE. I just wish there was a better version of the former available to view.


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#36 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 07:34 AM

Okay ..... okay ..... okay, I'll admit it.  that trailer was funny.

 

BUT, I hope I won't see any groin kicking or fart jokes in this thing ... I mean it!  

 

I'm kind of talking tongue in cheek here, but I'm also somewhat serious.  I've not seen a good comedy that that had maybe one or two swear words and didn't rely on body function / groin kicking humor in ... what now, 20 years or more?

 

The 1970s was like the last gasp of clean humor that was actually funny, with maybe a swear word or two tossed in.  In the 1980s and sorta kinda late 1970s, "things were bulging at the seams", so to speak for mainstream humor.  Vegas / Nightshow "dirty" humor was creeping into movies until it just exploded in the 80s.  Then in the 90s it's like funny movies weren't funny anymore, a few gems here and there ...

 

So, you've shown me this.  And my hopes are stirred, though not rekindled.  I'm going to watch this with an open mind.  

 

Sorry for the rant.  But I'm an old school clean humor for the masses kind of guy.  It's not that I don't appreciate blue humor, but there was a time when you could take a kid to a film aimed at adults and not have to worry about him being exposed to stuff you didn't want him exposed to.  

 

So, I'm going to stream this ... but first I need to head out to the coast and grab some footage   :)

I saw it on Netflix's top ten funniest comedy's you've never heard of.  Not everyone has the same taste in a sense of humor at all.   Both Tucker and Dale and Cabin in the Woods are dark comedies making fun of horror movies.  You can't take them seriously at all because they are parodies.    But yeah, neither of these are family friendly comedies if that is what you're looking for.


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#37 John E Clark

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 11:04 AM

I saw it on Netflix's top ten funniest comedy's you've never heard of.  Not everyone has the same taste in a sense of humor at all.   Both Tucker and Dale and Cabin in the Woods are dark comedies making fun of horror movies.  You can't take them seriously at all because they are parodies.    But yeah, neither of these are family friendly comedies if that is what you're looking for.

 

For some of us, the 60's and 70's barrier breaking films, despite their 'low humor', were liberating from straight laced prudery.

 

As for bodies in wood chippers as a comedic device... there is just such a scene in "Fargo"(1996). As for Jane Fonda and 'low humor', I believe the scene were she is seen sitting on the pot, presumably performing necessary body functions, was perhaps one of the first such shots in "Fun With Dick and Jane"(1977). Nearly 2 decades before Hitchcock showed a toilet being flushed in "Psycho"(1960), which some consider to be a first in at least showing a toilet in operation.

 

Then there's the avoidance of even showing an unoccupied double bed in a married couple's bedroom...  Especially in 50s/60s TV shows...

 

The 80s also saw a rise in the Trauma Team's productions such as "Toxic Waste Avenger"(1984) and "Surf Nazis Must Die"(1987).

 

Here's an article on research into the relationship between 'watch camp movies' and 'intelligence'...

 

http://www.independe...s-a7171436.html


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#38 George Ebersole

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 03:40 PM

Well, it's just my opinion.  Sorry for the rant, but I do stand by it.


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#39 George Ebersole

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Posted 17 September 2016 - 08:59 AM

To get this thread back on track; "Ghost Town" is exceptionally well lit, and has some intimate cinematography.


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#40 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 05:11 PM

 

Better not watch Sausage Party then.......

I have no idea how someone can go from writing the near-perfect Superbad to haha food funnies.


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Technodolly

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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Wooden Camera

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Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Opal