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How do they do this ghosting effect & flares?

flare ghost effect ghosting

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#1 Roger Alexander

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Posted 04 September 2016 - 12:58 AM

I've seen this "ghosting" thing in a few videos but I'm unsure of how it's done? I assumed it was a tilt shift lens and they just mess around with it while shooting or is it something else? Maybe they put some sort of glass/prism in front of the lens to obscure the image?

 

You can see it in this video from 00:15-00:18

https://youtu.be/YUYjxf9rHCY?t=13s

 

 

Also, there's heavy use of flares in the video. Normally with flares, you shine a light along the edge of the lens. Sometimes you can see the light fixture come in and out of frame to create the flare. However, you never see any fixtures here in this video. I'm curious if I'm missing something here. Anyone know how to reproduce these flares? I thought maybe he was doing it in post, but the subject's image is effected by the flare which makes me think its practical. You can see a good portion of the flares at 2:50-2:55. I'm sure part of it has to do with the lens he is using and how it refracts light? or do you think its added in post?

 

 

Attached Images

  • ghost.JPG
  • flare 1.JPG

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#2 KH Martin

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 07:02 AM

I've gotten ghosting effects like this by accident, way WAY back in time, just shooting into normal (not front-surface) mirrors, like in medicine cabinets. Very prevalent with macro as I recall (was using Super8 equipment, probably Chinon glass.)

 

You can affect tonalities in an image in an indirect way by messing with the light coming to lens that isn't directed at subject (that's part of the whole LightFlex deal, though when used clumsily you really flatten the image.) Using that same principle, you could beamsplitter in a 'light ray' in a manner as simple as drawing a line with chalk on a blackboard at right angles to the actual frame, and depending on how out of focus that image was relative to the subject and how much light you hit it with, you'd get a diffuse mess-look as is seen in the second image. Shoot, you could do it without a beamsplitter, I've hung small objects directly in front of frame and hit them with light while out of focus to create similar messes for in-camera energy weapon discharges and other atmospheric effects. Just depends how your glass takes out of focus imagery as to how well it can work.


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Pro 8mm

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Quantum Music Works

Zylight

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post