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Film dispenser

film stock 16mm 100ft 400ft

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#1 Sv Bell

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 10:09 AM

Is there on the market some sort of film dispenser, allowing us to keep large spools of 2000' film stock, and transfer lengths of 100 ft on a smaller spool for shooting?

 

Occasionally I see good deals on larger film cans but my camera only use 100 ft spools so I was wondering if there's a way I could buy these large reels, and conveniently transfer on 100ft spools.

 

sv


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#2 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 10:12 AM

You can do it with rewinds in a darkroom.
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#3 Sv Bell

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 10:18 AM

Do rewinds measure the length of film?

Of you just fill the target spool with a random length and it doesn't have to be exactly 100'?


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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 11:07 AM

Rewinds just rewind, if you get a new 100' spool of stock from Kodak you can check the lip remaining of the spool walls. You can then feel what is correct in the dark when the spool is full. It's rather tactile process..


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#5 Jesse Andrewartha

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 11:29 AM

If you're winding 16mm onto daylight spools, then it's 43 winds = 100ft. 

 

-Jesse-


Edited by Jesse Andrewartha, 13 September 2016 - 11:29 AM.

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#6 Sv Bell

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Posted 13 September 2016 - 12:19 PM

Good to know!

Thanks!

 

sv


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#7 Simon Wyss

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 04:51 AM

You can buy yourself a synch roller with foot counter.

Remove the counter from its housing and redraw the figures with

luminescent paint. Also repaint the 0 on the sprocket tab.

 

Then, the paint acitivated, you can read the exact length

pulled over the roller in the dark. That’s how I do it.


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#8 Pavan Deep

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 06:53 AM

I use 16mm in cameras that take 100ft daylight spools, but I always buy 400ft lengths. To make spooling easier I have made system based around a 400ft magazine from a CP-16 camera. The advantage is that the magazine has two separate compartment. I have made a light tight chamber with a footage counter.

The process is simple I load the fresh 400ft in the dark then feed it to the second chamber via the light tight chamber and the footage counter,from now I can work in normal daylight and can easily wind all the film to the second chamber. After this I set the counter to zero and replace the empty core in the first chamber with an empty 100ft daylight spool and wind back 100ft.

Pav
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#9 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 14 September 2016 - 06:15 PM

Pav, is your footage counter sprocket driven, or is there a little arm with a jockey wheel riding on the roll? A jockey wheel counter is not much better than our gloved finger checking the roll near the edge of the metal spool.

If one is rewinding onto metal spools, 100' or 200', it's fairly easy with practice to get the film length about right. Does the length really need to be perfect? I say no, but we all may feel differently.

One thought that keeps recuring to me from the various versions of these posts, is that people's fingers are much less familiar with handling film than they were in the days when almost everything was cut with a work print. Sad to see these skills lost, but they can be learned quickly.

EDIT: It is quite a cool DIY idea to use mags to re-spool film. On proviso that there is no scratching or other risk. If one does use sprockets in the footage counter system, maybe that is ok if there is zero chance of any damage or alteration to the film perfs. For 16mm, we only have one perf per frame, yes?

Edited by Gregg MacPherson, 14 September 2016 - 06:19 PM.

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#10 Simon Wyss

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 02:00 AM

My fingers are still familiar with photographic film, magnetic film, magnetic recording tape, auxiliary stocks, pressure sensitive tape, and more. The reason for my setup was that I imported Fomapan R 100 into my country and sold it. In the beginning, the film was available in 2000-ft. lengths as 35-mm. and as 16-mm. stock. When I once measured a 400-ft. portion to discover that its length was 406-20, that is 406½ feet, I felt miserable. Some time later FilmoTec of Wolfen stated that they snip their darkroom portions to the nominal length. What a pity!

 

When I purchase a 200-ft. portion of any film stock I want to be able to use 200 foot, so there must be additional length for threading up the camera. The price is given, the quantity of material should, too. They print a frigginfigure on the label.


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#11 Pavan Deep

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 03:49 AM

In my system the mechanical counter is sprocket driven and it is accurate. The CP-16 magazine is ideal as it has two separate chambers and it doesn't have the little arm with a jockey wheel riding on the roll like we see on many other film magazines.

 

Pav


Edited by Pavan Deep, 15 September 2016 - 03:50 AM.

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#12 Sv Bell

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Posted 15 September 2016 - 09:24 PM

OK so I headed to Ebay, and ordered a basic Craig rewinds. I should have the pair in hands next week!

I'll wind my own 100ft spools... and try to roll the spool in the right direction.

 

Out of curiosity, what does it do if it's not rolled in the right direction? Like, if the film's base is out, facing the lens, and emulsion is 'inside'...? I suspect it gives a ghosty image, soft focus and hazy edges, something like that?

 

sv


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#13 Jesse Andrewartha

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 05:00 PM

You'll be filtering the image through the antihalation backing (or in the case of colour neg, through the remjet), so it'll mostly be very underexposed... just remember to wind the film completely onto a reel, then back onto your spools to ensure correct winding. Make sure you lay everything out in an 'easy-to-feel-\' configuration before you go lights off!

 

Keep in mind, though... you're loading daylight spools, so you will see easily whether your film is wound correctly.


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#14 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 06:01 PM

All that the camera cares about is that the emulsion is at the front,  the lens is trying to focus on that plane,  and the perfs are on the correct side and that the edge numbers or bar code are not in reverse order.

 

None of this is hard to organize.Give it a go.


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#15 Sv Bell

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Posted Yesterday, 11:42 PM

Learning curve, learning curve!!

 

OK here's where I stand. Tonight I attempted to re-spool a 400 ft onto the 3.5" 100 ft spool using Craig rewinds. First thing I noticed once I open in the dark the brand new 400 ft can: the film is on a core. Don't laugh, I'm new to this!  :D

 

I was pretty disappointed and tried to figure how I can work it out. I ended up putting back the 400 ft in its light tight can. I'm missing something, some sort of reel I can open and load the core into, and mount it on the rewinds.

 

Now my question is: where do I find these reels to load the core? I looked on Ebay but I'm not quite sure what it's called, what to search for...

Any hint?

 

Thanks folks!


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#16 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted Yesterday, 11:59 PM

Learning curve alert..! Scarey, but you will be OK.

Any new procedure at this stage you should first try with junk film, with the lights on at first. Then in the dark.

Normally you use a "split spool" to hold the 400' roll. As you probably now guess, it opens (unscrews) so you mount the roll on the side, there is a pin that fits into one side of the core, then screw it back together.

I've seen split spools on eBay cheapish. Find the right person and they may give you one.

Once you are expert with your fingers you can do it without a split spool, just holding the roll between your fingers and sitting it on the spindle or the spindle hub on the rewind. No poop, I used to do it. Faster too. A 200' short end one can just hold the roll with ones fingers in the core. I am boasting for sure, don't try this yet.

Some white cotton gloves like the neg cutters used are good, especially if you are new. But truth is, once familiar, I didn't always use them, and had no problems.
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#17 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted Today, 02:55 AM

Bear in mind that you need to spool the film twice if you want the edge numbers in the correct order and the perfs on the correct side.

 

Camera original from factory is by default B wind. If you look at the roll,  emulsion in,  ready to shoot,  with the leader facing you,  pointing to the ground,  the perfs are on the right.


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