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IB print??


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#1 Chris Burke

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 05:43 PM

What is meant by IB Technicolor Print? Also a Technirama print? (Horizontal??)  Going to a film fleadh with mostly 70mm prints, but they have added a few 35mm IB prints and Technirama to the feast. 


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#2 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 06:26 PM

IB prints are color die transfer, which is a lot more work in the lab, but delivers a far more stable (long term) color image.

Standard color print film, has issues with fading over time, even modern stocks. IB prints don't have those issues.

This means, a print from even the early days of color, will still retain much of it's original color information decades later. This is why so many people prefer to project them, rather then a "restored" version, which may not look the same.

Unfortunately, IB prints were expensive to make, so once color print film took over, they were only used for archiving and/or special circumstances.

Technirama is an 8 perf 35mm horizontal format, nearly identical to VistaVision, but with the addition of anamorphic lenses. It was initially designed as a cheaper alternative to 5/70, but the projectors were expensive and only worked with the single format. Most 5/70 projectors also run 35mm, so it was a lot easier for theaters to buy those by-platform rather then one that does a single job like VistaVision/Technirama.

In the end, Technirama wound up being a great format for 70mm blow up's and there were many films shot on 8/35 and released in 70mm, though the cinemascope 35mm format wound up being the mainstay release format for most movies.
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#3 Jesse Andrewartha

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 06:52 PM

This short video gives a great overview of the IB print, or imbibition print. 

 


Edited by Jesse Andrewartha, 21 September 2016 - 07:04 PM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 06:56 PM

IB prints were actually cheap to make per print but expensive (and time-consuming) to set up the matrices to make the prints, so Technicolor got rid of the process when print orders declined in the 1970's. Dye transfer printing is not a photographic process, the print stock is not light sensitive, it does not have an emulsion, and it isn't "processed" -- it is more akin to color printing for a book: yellow, cyan, and magenta dyes are pressed in separate passes onto a clear strip of film with a mordant to absorb the dye.

 

Since no color see coupler technology was involved, the color dyes used in printing were very stable, archival, similar to Kodachrome where the dyes were added during processing.

 

In the 1970's, the average studio release was reduced to a few hundred prints at the most and Technicolor got rid of their IB machinery in their three printing labs: Los Angeles, London, and Rome.  "Godfather Part 2" was one of the last IB prints made in Los Angeles; "Star Wars" had only one IB print made in London as a test probably, and it was the only reference for how the colors originally looked when the movie was later restored, and "Suspiria" was famous for being one of the last IB print orders to come out of Rome.

 

Technicolor built a small prototype IB printer in the 1990's to experiment with bringing back the process but discovered that even with today's large print orders, studios no longer had a month to time and create the printing matrices, they wanted a shorter turnaround time for punching out thousands of release prints, plus their prototype printer was too small to make thousands of prints quickly anyway.  So you had a few major releases using this IB printer -- another rerelease of "Gone with the Wind" and "Wizard of Oz", "Apocalypse Now Redux", and then a few scattered prints made for "Batman and Robin", "Godzilla", "Bulworth", "The Wedding Planner", and one print of "The Thin Red Line" finished after the release date and given to Terrance Malick.


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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 21 September 2016 - 10:30 PM

Thanks for the explanation. I am very thankful for having an art house in my home town that is showing these. The Vikings is screening from which what they are calling a technirama print.  Is this printed to a standard 4 perf vertical pull down print or does it run through the projector horizontally? They list it as a 35mm Technirama Print.

http://somervillethe...-presentations/


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#6 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 22 September 2016 - 12:28 AM

It's a 4 perf 35mm print most likely. Nobody has horizontal projectors anymore, there were only a few ever made.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 September 2016 - 09:01 AM

I agree that it is unlikely to be a horizontal print with a 1.5X squeeze, both the 8-perf 35mm projectors and that squeeze ratio anamorphic projector lens are rare.

 

Probably a 4-perf 35mm scope print.


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