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How to shoot stop motion ?

Stop motion Filmmaking

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#1 Mohamed Osam

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 08:58 AM

Hello , 

 

I would like to know how to shoot stop motion as it in this video technically . 


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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 09:12 AM

You basically shoot one frame at a time, moving the subject (live subject or a model or in a series of drawings) between shooting each frame, so as to create the impression of continuous motion. Some video cameras can do this or a stills camera is commonly used and then import the stills as an image sequence into a NLE, 

 

https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Animation

 

https://en.wikipedia...iki/Stop_motion

 

In this case you move the subject and camera between each frame. You'll have to work out the speed the subject will be moving at in order to work out the distance between each frame. The concern would be keeping the camera set on the subject so that they don't wobble around the frame, perhaps using a mark on the viewing screen as a reference. Motion tracking in post would assist with in this in post.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 21 November 2016 - 09:18 AM.

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#3 Phil Connolly

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 06:11 PM

Most professional stop motion animators use a software package called Dragon Frame. It allows you to control most of the settings on many dlsrs and gives you a live view of the image - with lots of framing guides and onion skin options. These allow you to see the previous frame(s) and check alignment/movement etc.

 

You can just do simple stop motion by taking stills on a camera and using a tape measure/marks on the monitor to line up shots as well. But the software makes it easier and gives you more tools.

 

I


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#4 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 08:06 PM

Mohamed,
That was a delightful little film...
In the old days, when lots of artists played with film cameras, the effect you see here would be easily created with a windup 16mm Bolex. Fairly close to what is seen here anyway.

If you shoot actual single frames in a film camera, hand held, keeping steady (still), perhaps shooting two or three frames of each or some particular mment, you are very clse to what we see here.

Some call "stop motion" a process where you lock the camera off and incrementally alter the subject. The scene of the boy being beaten, becoming a crushed little sack, is basically being done that way.

With film work processes being basically lost to most people now, the digital option may be to shoot, even at 24fps, select frames at an interval, and replicate some, occasionally. It is a disturbing thing to me, that digital, begins by finding the means to replicate the look of film, then, as in this technical case, achieves smething like single frame and stop motion, by a clumsy paraphrase of proccess.

Are there any artist left in Egypt who have done what I describe? Find one, and he/she will be an interesting person to meet. Banging off single frames on a Bolex etc is an unmissable experience for any artist working in film.

Edited by Gregg MacPherson, 28 November 2016 - 08:08 PM.

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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 08:24 PM

The switch to using digital still cameras for stop motion and time lapse happened some time ago because you aren't limited to recording video codecs, you can shoot full-frame high resolution stills like at 4K, 6K or 8K and all in raw mode, keeping all the dynamic range of the camera's sensor with no compression added.  Then you can batch convert the stills to whatever format you want.


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