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23.98?


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#1 germz1128

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 04:27 PM

Can someone please explain the reason HD projects shoot at a 23.98 Frame rate rather than 24. Thank you
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 04:39 PM

Can someone please explain the reason HD projects shoot at a 23.98 Frame rate rather than 24.  Thank you

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Because most people edit the sound to edited NTSC downconversions, and NTSC slows 24 fps to 23.976 fps plus adds a 3:2 pulldown to get up to NTSC's 29.97 fps (59.94i). If you were going to edit both picture & sound in a pure 24P environment and not mix the sound to any downconversions, then you probably don't have to use 23.98P (although NTSC cameras that shoot 24P actually shoot at 23.98P anyway.)

Most U.S. features send an NTSC tape of the offline cut to a sound editor, who inputs this into his system. Plus the initial mix may be to an NTSC tape.
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#3 Mike Brennan

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 04:50 PM

Warning, bear in mind that 23.98p and 24p to most production people mean the same thing!
If soemone wants you to shoot 24p they probably mean 23.98p...

As a side note :)
Also confusing if you are in Europe or PAL countries where (before HD came along) there was more 24p offlines done (of film project) than 23.98p offlines. A 24p offiline is achieved on PAL equipment by dubbing the 24p to PAL, so called slow PAL.

Now with HD cams in abundance, there is more 23.98p than 24p. You'll appreciate shooting 23.98p limits the offline resources available (they need to be NTSC) if you are in a PAL country wher PAL offlines and decks are a dime a dozen.

Thats one of the reasons some features are shot at 25p.

Mike Brennan
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