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Simulating rain in front of fixture

rain practical effect FX special lighting night weather

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#1 Jacob Mitchell

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 06:19 PM

Hey all,

 

DPing an independent short come December 9th-11th. There is a small Interior Night scene on location, where I would like to simulate stormy weather outside. I would like to do something like water in front of a fixture, but how can I achieve this? We will likely be using something like an Arri 1K with Urban Vapor gel outside the window to simulate a street light. Won't be shooting towards the window, so the rain effect will just need to be a texture.

 

Also, would like to simulate thunder, in combination with the street lights. We'll have a couple of SPE-6 Flickermasters. How can this be achieved?

 

Thanks ahead of time!

 

 


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#2 J. Winfield Heckert

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 09:35 PM

Focus the light through the window and aim a garden hose at the top of the window. The rain will trickle down over the window. 


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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 05:23 AM

Depending on the circumstances, a fresnel may not project a particularly sharp shadow - I've used profiles (er, ellipsoidals, Americans) in these circumstances.

 

A pump spray bottle can be an OK way of producing slow trickles - you can just clamp a piece of glass (careful!) or transparent plasticl (safer!) in a C-stand. With a towel beneath it.

 

P


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 12:30 PM

Yes, often rain isn't pouring down a window pane, it is beading up and dribbling down. You could create a rain bar above the glass, something like a rubber tube with holes poked in it, or you could do a light spray in the air above the window and a strong fan to blow the spray onto the glass. Or do what Phil suggests.

 

A 2K backed-up further instead of a 1K will give you sharper shadows, maybe with the fresnel lens removed (but it will be dimmer then).  I've also used Lekos for a sharper effect.


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#5 Jacob Mitchell

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 02:32 PM

Hey everyone! Thanks so much for the replies... very helpful suggestions. I'll likely switch over to a 2k as you suggested David, to make sure the rain is a bit more distinguished. Would something as simple as a hose, capped at the end, with holes spanning the length of the window work? Then just placing it above and against the window?

 

Also Phil, why are ellipsoidal lights called "profile" lights?


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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 02:35 PM

I'm not entirely sure. Possibly because you can put a shape into the beam. But in the UK they're "profiles," at least in theatrical circles.

 

P


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#7 Jacob Mitchell

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 02:49 PM

Any thoughts on simulating faint lightning as well?
 


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#8 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 02:58 PM

Tricky on rolling shutter cameras.

 

What are you shooting on?


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#9 Jacob Mitchell

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 02:59 PM

Phil,

 

Shooting on Red Epic MX.


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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 03:13 PM

Ah.

 

The only real solution is something like an Outsight Flash Bandit, which will allow you to avoid flash banding. In fact, that may be the only solution.

 

(NB there is at least one company out there selling an LED it claims can do flash synchronisation to avoid rolling shutter issues which actually can't, so test carefully)

 

P


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