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CFL Sockets for Softbox Mounts


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#1 Daniel Meier

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 06:25 PM

You shure all know these cheap CFL Softbox Kits. I own one of those sets. It includes two sockets (supporting 4 CFL lamps each).

https://www.amazon.d...s=Life of Photo

 

They have E27 sockets. The CFLs that came with this set have 75W power at 5400K and tent to have a decent amount of green tint.

 

I thought about hooking this setup up to a more high quality light output (high CRI)

My first approach would be to use halogen bulbs only. But that might cause a heat problem, since I would have to use fairly high wattage bulbs to get the same light output as the CFLs give me. 

 

Second idea was to use high CRI CFLs. But I only know the ones that KinoFlo make. And they have only 26W.

 

Can you recommend any other high CRI CFLs? Or any experience in using other bulb types (LED, Halogen).

 


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#2 JD Hartman

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 07:03 PM

No help at all.  Seems that production of CFLs are be phased out.  Unlikely to find high CRI, high output CFLs still being made.  I think you need to search out a high CRI LED replacement.  Maybe CREE has something that would fit.  http://lighting.cree.com/


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#3 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 07:19 PM

BLUEMAX  are still out there.  I made a few softboxes at one time with them.  Really bright and although the CRI is 93, you might need 1/8th CTB to match HMI's.  

 

At one time Home Depot has these bulbs

:1941ccc2dae051cc1972de7a38d31e31.jpg

They were discontinued cause they cost too much.  But they were really close to Kino's  Just needed 1/8th - green.  On the other hand, if you want a unit that just matches most overheads, those were perfect.  In the average office interview, you just turn em on and you're good to go.


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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 07:21 PM

You might consider putting some conventional fluorescent tubes in it. Depending on the size of the softbox, various layouts might work. Perhaps these would suit: they're only two feet long, rated at 18W each. It's possible that the low-cost CFLs you've been using don't really consume 75W so you may find five or six enough to replace them. You'd need to budget for holders and ballasts, but the wiring is reasonably straightforward and you can swap the tubes out to change colour temperature. I would recommend budgeting also for shatter sleeves for them, as are used in the food service industry. They don't make the tubes much tougher, but they do contain the mess.

 

The other way to go, if you're feeling only slightly more ambitious, is 150W ceramic metal halide. They come in single-ended G12 or double-ended RX7 types; 5200K is more common in RX7. This is the technology used in retail premises and sold by Cool Lights in their 150W CDM fresnel. They have broadly the performance of HMI and you can get them in various colour temperatures, and party colours. The only downside is that they don't hot restrike on conventional ballasts. Look out for colour rendering, though; they're available in every grade from desperately cheap to very expensive, and performance changes accordingly. Again, ballasts are required, and there is a brief warmup time. They should not, in my view, be used outside of an enclosure sufficient to contain fragments of glass should a lamp fail.

 

There are larger metal halide lamps available in 400W and above which might suit, but I'm not experienced enough with their colour performance to recommend them.

 

 

Oh - edit - if you go for metal halide, get the electronic ballasts and they're admirably flicker free.


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#5 Daniel Meier

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 10:37 AM

Thanks guys for your input.

I think I'm gonna try out these high-power LEDs:

https://www.amazon.d...walimex led e27

 

They have about 100 lm/w. 


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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 10:43 AM

Sounds reasonable, but I'd get TLCI numbers for them. CRI is not an adequate way to characterise discontinuous-spectrum light sources, and you may end up in the same situation as with your CCFLs.

 

P


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