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Thinking about buying a jib/crane...


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#1 Jack OGara

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 11:55 AM

Hi everyone.

Looking for some help on something.

 

I am always looking to add more gear to my collection. Most of which I rent out with myself as operator or bring along with me on jobs.

Thinking about adding a 32 foot jib/crane to that collection. 

 

Going to be using my DJI Ronin as the pan tilt head so I am just buying the crane.

 

Getting it a bit customised from the factory in China, so yes going to import one, but it is basically the same as the Proaim one.

(I believe these guys make theirs and a few other brands, hard to say..)

 

 

So I am wondering if it is worth it. 

 

I have 2 indie features coming up that I can use it in.

Potentially a higher end short if it gets funded and any student films that I can make use of it in the coming months.

 

Generally do you find that jibs get used much in work around the UK?

Would the Ronin be too limited? I already have extension arms on it but it wont take anything like an Alexa or ENG like length. So limited in camera choice to RED and other cameras that sort of build size.

Insurance is another thing. I already think I need to get some but most of the time I am covered under the production's.

 

 

Thanks guys!

Jack,


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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 03:52 PM

 I would have some concerns about the structural safety of a Chinese made crane. Production insurance doesn't cover you for personal liability.


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#3 Jack OGara

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 04:07 PM

A 32 foot crane is going to require two experienced crane grips to operate safely. I would also have some concerns about the structural safety of a Chinese made crane. Production insurance doesn't cover you for personal liability.

 

I have done a bit and I intend on working with someone who also knows a bit. 

Though I would not say I am experienced at it like someone who has been doing it for 10 years. But you got to start somewhere.

I find the bast way to learn is to jump into the deep end, though obviously safety first...

 

I see that argument a lot, while it is a concern of mine I have had quite a bit of China made stuff.

Hell, most of the stuff we use is from there...

That and people do import the same ones and sell them as other brands so I have some confidence in it.

 

I think one of the best things about these is that they are really customisable. Can go from 10ft to 32ft so might not start off at 32ft but will work my way up.


Edited by Jack OGara, 10 December 2016 - 04:13 PM.

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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 05:21 PM

Looking at the Proaim version, i see that it's really a jib, not a crane, so you probably don't need the grips. Chinese made gear is very hit and miss in terms of quality. The stuff that is made under license generally has much better QC than the knock-off/budget brands.


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#5 Jack OGara

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 05:52 PM

I have always known them as being called both. But yea Jib is the correct word to use... Silly me :P


Edited by Jack OGara, 10 December 2016 - 06:04 PM.

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#6 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 06:24 PM

It's quite a big step to have a 32' jib in your back pocket.  I used to have a 5' jib in the 80s,  working on indie,  art stuff and it was great,  build like a brick shithouse,  very stiff.  Which bings us around to an important issue,  a couple of issues actually...

 

The load rating on a jib, or a jib approaching being a crane in the contemporrary era,  is not that meaningfull on its own.  The stiffness and the inertia will also help define it's usefullness.

 

Weird? No. The light gibs/cranes have guy wires built in to help,  but they won't solve all the problem (stiffness).  Using wire vs a trussed structure is done for convenience,  storage.  Otherwise one wouyld have a large section aluminium arm,  or a truss structure. 

 

The smoothnes of traditional crane moves came from their inertia.  The physics,  as an intuitive concept,  is that masses held at the max distance from the rotational centre will give the max moment of inertia.  This moment of inertia means that the camera will accelerate smoothly and slow down smoothly.  Inertia just means that objects will,  if you like, resist changing speed.


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