Jump to content


Photo

Shooting in the rain.


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1497 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 13 December 2016 - 03:13 AM

There's a nearby creek, and it's been raining recently.  I'd like to get down to the shore and shoot some close shots of the water surface.  But, with rain, mud and rushing water, I'm thinking that's not good for a camera.  I'll be using a DSLR. 

 

Any reccomendations?  Can I just throw some plastic around it, or do I have to buy one of those professional bags?

 

thanks for any reply


  • 0


Support Cinematography.com and buy gear using our Amazon links!
PANASONIC LUMIX GH5 Body 4K Mirrorless Camera, 20.3 Megapixels, Dual I.S. 2.0, 4K 422 10-bit, Full Size HDMI Out, 3 Inch Touch LCD, DC-GH5KBODY (USA Black)

#2 aapo lettinen

aapo lettinen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Other
  • Finland

Posted 13 December 2016 - 03:38 AM

it kind of depends, splashes can be difficult and plastic wraps may restrict shooting quite a lot... but you will get great shots for sure so it'll be worth it anyway  :lol:

 

it is very good idea to use a filter on the lens though, any filter or clear glass which can be cleaned every time it gets water on it will do. 

You can use lens cleaning fluid (rosco etc.) to ease wiping the water off, I tend to have a blower bulb with me all the time in these situations and just blowing the droplets to the sides to clear the filter. 

 

if you don't have a pro rain cover for the camera you can use plastic or watertight fabric and, if it's not too windy, attach it to the camera with the same kind of clamps used for attaching gels to lights 

 

mmynu5C2MospBzYL6kgih2w.jpg


  • 0

#3 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1594 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 13 December 2016 - 03:50 AM

I guess there are two schools of thought here.. the pegs and plastic bags .. why spend the money.. or the ..how much did you DSLR cost.. and you would risk it to save $25-50.. for a purpose built, fully water proof cover designed for your camera..

 

Bit of a no brainer in my humble opinion .. 


  • 1

#4 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1497 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 13 December 2016 - 04:41 AM

Thanks.  Yeah, I don't want to get it wet, but I was wondering if buying a pro-bag was just spending a lot of money on something that could be replaced by a cheap roll of Glad wrap or something.

 

Thanks again.


  • 0

#5 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1594 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 13 December 2016 - 05:38 AM

Yes but the next time its raining you can use the same ,admittedly over priced,rain cover..  I think its a dis economy to save a  relatively small amount .. on a very useful item.. to protect an expensive item..  you can even claim it off your tax..   they are also handy for dusty /sandy locations.. 


  • 1

#6 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1497 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 13 December 2016 - 07:28 AM

Point taken.  Thanks for that.  A $50 dollar bag is less expensive than a $2000 camera.


  • 0

#7 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1594 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 13 December 2016 - 07:51 AM

Dont want to be preachy.. and the decision is of course yours .. just my own opinion ..


  • 0

#8 aapo lettinen

aapo lettinen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Other
  • Finland

Posted 13 December 2016 - 07:52 AM

of course it is better to buy the dedicated camera cover if you have possibility to do that and you'll need it very often. I thought that the options were a self-made cover + possibility to get great shots today, or drive to a shop to purchase a factory made cover + miss today's shots because of the time loss. 

 

rain covers are no splash bags however and don't protect from waves so if you are just trying to protect the camera from rain and small amounts of flying seawater, the self made cover may work just as well


  • 0

#9 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1594 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 13 December 2016 - 08:10 AM

ah!  right thats a good point.. was it a case of wanting to get the shots right away..? in which case yes .. a tough bin liner bag and some gaffer tape will do it.. sorry I didn't see that way..  and agreed probably good to buy an actual water tight splash bag if your getting right down by the water level.. 

 

Sorry Aapo.. I wasn't meaning to diss your post.. 


  • 0

#10 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 695 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 13 December 2016 - 06:55 PM

The problem with rain bags built for cameras is they aren't usually sized to account for the rods, mattebox etc.  So I usually end up using a clear plastic trash bag which is in some ways easier as you can see every part of the camera through it.  But I wish there were more bags and rain jackets that were built with a "mattebox and accessories" in mind.


Edited by Michael LaVoie, 13 December 2016 - 06:56 PM.

  • 0

#11 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1594 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 13 December 2016 - 07:50 PM

The problem with rain bags built for cameras is they aren't usually sized to account for the rods, mattebox etc.  So I usually end up using a clear plastic trash bag which is in some ways easier as you can see every part of the camera through it.  But I wish there were more bags and rain jackets that were built with a "mattebox and accessories" in mind.

 

 

Im surprised no one has made any rain covers for DSLR,s set up for shooting video..  Portabrace ?.. 


  • 0

#12 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 695 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 13 December 2016 - 08:37 PM

This is the rain cover for the FS7  It's a Portabrace but you can see that it stops at the end of a rather short zoom lens.  It's not meant to be put over a rig like this:

FS7_Final-552x364.jpg

I haven't found any rain jackets or bags that will let you quickly protect or carry a rig like this.


  • 0

#13 aapo lettinen

aapo lettinen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 898 posts
  • Other
  • Finland

Posted 14 December 2016 - 12:31 AM

ah!  right thats a good point.. was it a case of wanting to get the shots right away..? in which case yes .. a tough bin liner bag and some gaffer tape will do it.. sorry I didn't see that way..  and agreed probably good to buy an actual water tight splash bag if your getting right down by the water level.. 

 

Sorry Aapo.. I wasn't meaning to diss your post.. 

 

No worries I just understood the question differently and replied based on that  ^_^

 

I tend to keep some plastic bags and watertight cloth +clamps in the camera bag all the time so it is easy to make a temporary rain cover out of them if it suddenly starts to rain. I have attached velcro to the sides of the cloth and mattebox so that it is easy to attach it quickly to the mattebox and the rest can be handled with clamps. Not necessarily super practical in all situations but very quick to use and so small that you can transport all the materials in your pocket  :lol:

 

30792956514_d29f4b8948_z.jpg

 

31262224200_35e2a25358_z.jpg

 

30792956104_b2a68c3465_z.jpg

 

I am also using this with more expensive cameras like FS7 when needed


  • 0

#14 Robin R Probyn

Robin R Probyn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1594 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Tokyo

Posted 14 December 2016 - 01:12 AM

This is the rain cover for the FS7  It's a Portabrace but you can see that it stops at the end of a rather short zoom lens.  It's not meant to be put over a rig like this:

FS7_Final-552x364.jpg

I haven't found any rain jackets or bags that will let you quickly protect or carry a rig like this.

 

 

Yes I was referring to the OP who said he would be shooting with a DSLR.. but I agree re covers for Fs7/F5.. I bought a purpose designed rain cover for my F5.. and it was way too small.. luckily I still had a very expensive portabrace rain cover I had for my PMW500.. this works great for the F5 with CN7 zoom and mattbox.. EVF a bit tight.. but F5 designed one is un un useable with a zoom lens.. 


  • 0

#15 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1497 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 14 December 2016 - 09:48 AM

Interesting.  I wonder if I should get a camo one.  Since I moved to the forested coast region I've seen more dear and coyotes than ever before, and I'm wondering if maybe capturing some wildlife images might be worth doing. 


  • 0

#16 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1497 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 15 December 2016 - 08:43 AM

Dude at Mike's camera called it a "rain sleeve".


  • 0

#17 George Ebersole

George Ebersole
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1497 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 15 December 2016 - 06:45 PM

Bought it none too soon, only now the creek is is like the Mississippi during a flash flood, all brown and rushing down stream, carrying logs and other flotsam and jetsam.  Too much water, and it's all brown and muddy.


  • 0



Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

CineLab

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

CineLab

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine