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Could you advise me for starting a career in Production?


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#1 Hyeokjun Kim

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 03:24 PM

Hello everyone.

 

I am a 22 year old guy from Korea who is now living in Vancouver.

I know that my age is not definitely young to put first step into this field,

but nonetheless, I am still determined to purse my dream now.

 

My goal is to become a director like David Fincher, and I want to develop my career in Production department.

Luckily, film industry in Vancouver is in pretty good state, and I asked to other people working in this field

and they say,

it is not hard to get hired as an entry level PA in Vancouver now.

 

My current plan is to work as a PA, and if I need to get a degree or academic knowledge, then go to school after certain level of

experience as a PA. And most of all, if I want to get into film school right now, I have to ask for my parents or otherwise I cannot.

 

I was hoping to hear how you guys started your career, and what you think of working as a PA as first step in career.

 

I look forward to your answer!


Edited by Hyeokjun Kim, 14 December 2016 - 03:25 PM.

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#2 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 04:54 PM

The thing I hope everyone realizes is there are multiple different ways one can rise through the ranks to become the director of wide theatrical releases. Some better than others, but we'll let that bridge become a 6 page argument when we cross it.

 

Whichever avenue you take, ensure you're extremely proactive, always available, business-minded, and remember to finish any projects you start.

Don't call yourself good until others say it first. Then work to make sure they remember it.

 

As for a degree, if you're not Mister Moneybags, try a technical school, or make friends who can teach you. Call me Kanye West but I feel universities are scams for most majors.


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#3 Hyeokjun Kim

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 05:45 PM

The thing I hope everyone realizes is there are multiple different ways one can rise through the ranks to become the director of wide theatrical releases. Some better than others, but we'll let that bridge become a 6 page argument when we cross it.

 

Whichever avenue you take, ensure you're extremely proactive, always available, business-minded, and remember to finish any projects you start.

Don't call yourself good until others say it first. Then work to make sure they remember it.

 

As for a degree, if you're not Mister Moneybags, try a technical school, or make friends who can teach you. Call me Kanye West but I feel universities are scams for most majors.

 

Thanks for the reply it means a lot to me. I searched history of some renown directors and as you said there were a number of options.

 

I was thinking of getting a loan and go to American film school...which is extremely expensive. but my concern is not just cost but saw lot of articles that says "Film school is just not worth it unless you are going for post-production department." all the other people I met also said same thing.

 

I will keep your advices about attitude in mind thank you really. could you just tell me what you think is the best option way to do please? it doesnt have to go over 6 pages.

even 6 lines would mean a lot to me


Edited by Hyeokjun Kim, 14 December 2016 - 05:46 PM.

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#4 Michael LaVoie

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 06:00 PM

If you mean AFI, that is expensive but from what I hear it's worth it.  Any film school is what you make of it.  The real key to directing is being able to finance, develop and sell the films you want to make.  If you can do that, then the artistic creative side of the process (which you can study in any number of ways) will either come to you or not but if it doesn't, you'll at least be able to get in the game as a producer and work with really great directors and help get their films made.

 

So from that point of view, I'd recommend studying producing.  Look for a school with really solid classes in the legal and business (financing and acquisitions side to film production.  Keep your creative inspirations open and always replenish the well of creativity for when you can direct but stay grounded in how to develop projects because that's really the key to breaking in when you don't know people already inside.

 

In a perfect world you'd meet your producing partner in film school and he or she would handle all the boring business stuff for you but I wouldn't roll the dice on that happening.  


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#5 Macks Fiiod

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 06:23 PM

I was thinking of getting a loan and go to American film school...which is extremely expensive.

 

Just like... don't do that...quite yet. See if you have an eye for it before you do anything. Entry level equipment is cheaper than ever.


Edited by Macks Fiiod, 14 December 2016 - 06:24 PM.

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#6 Hyeokjun Kim

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 09:02 PM

If you mean AFI, that is expensive but from what I hear it's worth it.  Any film school is what you make of it.  The real key to directing is being able to finance, develop and sell the films you want to make.  If you can do that, then the artistic creative side of the process (which you can study in any number of ways) will either come to you or not but if it doesn't, you'll at least be able to get in the game as a producer and work with really great directors and help get their films made.

 

So from that point of view, I'd recommend studying producing.  Look for a school with really solid classes in the legal and business (financing and acquisitions side to film production.  Keep your creative inspirations open and always replenish the well of creativity for when you can direct but stay grounded in how to develop projects because that's really the key to breaking in when you don't know people already inside.

 

In a perfect world you'd meet your producing partner in film school and he or she

would handle all the boring business stuff for you but I wouldn't roll the dice on that happening.  

 

 

Thank you for the reply. When you refer to "studying in school" you mean in proper film school?
 

I've seen lot of posts (more likely everyone seemed to agree) recommending or leaving positive comments on that school.

What do you think of other schools such as NYU or USC? and I've heard a lot of people telling "unless you are gonna work in post-production field, any degree or class from film school is not a big help." do you agree with that?

 

That's why I am now currently more focused on working in that field first off. getting experience first.

besides I want to test myself if I fit in this industry


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