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17 year old here looking for help and info!!


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#1 soad0488

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 07:37 PM

HEY!, im a 17 year old high school student, who is very passionate about theatre production, and who would like to go into film, here is a little more about me. At the end of the third quater of my junior year of high school, my average over all (all three years up to then) was about 76, or 78, i am not that great of a student, and i have slacked off badly this year. I have decided to cut classes and in the end most recently have added up about 10 detentions, and got suspended for 7 periods (not much but still goes on "pernamate record" ::CANT SPELL: But anyway, i have always wanted to make movies for many years, like the corny home made ones, but my friends never really were up to that and when they were it would only last about 10 min then it was over sadly. I was semi-antisocial since i look like im 14 i try to keep close to my good friends, and not join any clubs. When i got enough balls to, the club wouldnt let me in since i missed like 4 meetings due to drivers ed. But yeah, enough about that. I love to work on plays more then anything, i love the feeling of seeing something such as a plain stage turn into anything from a street, to a carnival. I have been told i have a great voice, and can act but personally i much rather be behind the scenes. I read books, and i visualize things perfectly, and mainly with the harry potter books, i visualized the castle, the mess hall and everything pretty much perfectly. Im not the self boasting kind of guy, but i will say this when it comes to plays and stuff i am really dedicated, and i think like a director many times. Ok here is what i would like to know. How would i be able to get into movie productions (i know i must go through art college, but are there any suggestions for a good college i can get into with my grades and an sat score of like 1440 ish (new SAT), can any of you give me tips, and i know this is a long shot, but allow me to come onto a set to see what it is really like, and tell me about yourselves, and how you go involed in this kind of stuff, my aim sn is SOAD0488, and msn messanger is gman0288@hotmail.com, you can im me there or email me (soad0488 is my aim mail too), yeah i know i will get some responses ::I hope::, but yeah thanks in advance!!!
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#2 anamexis

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 07:59 PM

Firstly, I'm sure I will not be the last to tell you that you should only post a thread in one form, as cross-posting to more than one forum creates confusion and clogs up the boards.

That said, I am a fellow 17 year old in film. I can tell you that there is a lot to be learned firstly from books and secondly from this board. I read everything here, and have learned a great amount from it. I tend to just sit back and read; while at times I feel I could answer a question, I can always be quite sure that someone else can answer it better.

As for getting on a film set, I can tell you how it worked out for me. I noticed there was a 48 hour film festival happening in my city (you may want to check if there is in yours- check here). I contacted the organizer, telling him about myself, that I was interested in a film, and that I was offering my help on a set. The day after he sent out an email, I got an offer from 3 teams. The organizer (Ira Livingston for any of you in the Twin Cities or Chicago) also is keeping me updated on another project he has going that I will be able to help with. I ended up picking a team for the 48 hour film, and I gripped/gaffed for the DP. This was really fun, and all of the people had experience in the industry. I cannot stress how much I learned just from one day helping out on a set. To the 2 teams who I had to turn down, I made sure to tell them that if they ever wanted help I was there. Lo and behold, a week after the festival, I get an email from a producer saying that they are about to start filming a feature-length film and that they could use my help. And that is how these next few weeks of my summer will be occupied. All of this from just one email offering my help.

Also, one thing I really recommend for teens interested in film is a job at a video rental store, if you can find one. The benefits are two-fold: get money to spend on DVDs, books, or film equipment; and then, get free access to the DVDs to learn more about film. Most all video rental stores allow their employees large amounts of free rentals, albeit usually overnight.

I think if you look through the forums, you will find a lot of your questions have been discussed at great length. Of course, note that these forums are cinematography-centric, so if you want to learn more about film direction or acting, this isn't really the place to look. Check the Education forum for information about film schools. Check the recommended books and films section. Search on the internet for local independent film organizations, give them an email offering your help. Always be on the lookout for opportunities, and when they come up, seize them.

Edited by anamexis, 17 June 2005 - 08:02 PM.

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#3 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 08:01 PM

HEY!, im a 17 year old high school student

I'm a 17 year old too.

(i know i must go through art college

Who said? You dont HAVE to do anything. If you have the money to go through "Art" college, do it. They can help you with Job Placement once your graduate, and if you attend a normal college (NYU, for example) you can also master in other subjects... Just in case film don't work out.

However, there are MANY people in the industry that have never gone to college (at least "Art" college). Many may have degree's in computer sciense, english, ect but I dont see how that applies to film.

but are there any suggestions for a good college i can get into with my grades and an sat score of like 1440 ish (new SAT), can any of you give me tips

While I cant vouch for the value of this college, Full Sail film school (www.fullsail.com) does not go by your grades / GPA, SAT scores ect. Note that they only specialize the in Entertainment Industry, so you cant get a BA in Business there...

I read books, and i visualize things perfectly, and mainly with the harry potter books, i visualized the castle, the mess hall and everything pretty much perfectly.

From this post, you can see you like Harry Potter, I do as well. A lot of people can "Visualize" the castle and Great Hall also, I can and I'm sure a lot of people here can. That is not whats important, what is important is HOW you visualize it. And if you wanna be a director you have to do more than just visualize the castle, you have to visualize how to move the camera and the actors so that they are in the places you want them.

When i got enough balls to, the club wouldnt let me in since i missed like 4 meetings due to drivers ed.

Sounds like somebody I know :ph34r:

can any of you give me tips, and i know this is a long shot, but allow me to come onto a set to see what it is really like,

A lot of big sets are closed to the public (unless of course there filming in downtown middle america, then you can usually watch from the police line "DO NOT CROSS". You would be surprised however, some studios give tours of there backlots, while I dont think they include many films being shot in them, it may help some.

Also, watch a lot of behind the scenes DVD stuff! Thats about as close to being on a film set as most will get (unless of course you get in good with someone, then usually they can take you on set with them)...

Just my $0.02...
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#4 soad0488

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 08:05 PM

lol, well my parents are the one who say i have to go to college to get a degree and they are right, becasue even if this doesnt work out a degree always is good
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#5 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 08:07 PM

Well you realise how far you get has a lot to do with who you know. That's why film schools and universities are always helpfull. (Out in the industry, the qualification doesn't mean poop, something to fall back on though, but it's who you meet)

Read some film books and photography books, go out with your SLR take some pictures to practice the theory, continue to make films with your friends but improve them using the knowledge you have gained, meet up with some other film bods and just make a movie! Doesn't matter how crap it comes out, watch it, and learn from your mistakes, watch it and think to your self "what can be improved?"

Well... good luck anyway!

Dan.
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#6 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 08:08 PM

Sometimes you have to ignor what mom tell you (like I do all the time) :lol: look at me... 17 and I have a job at the cinema (which is not very impressive) and I also do home networking on the side (I go to peoples homes and install Wi-Fi, ect)... I could make good money at this if I lived in a bigger city, but with a Pop of 60,000 I dont have much hope here...

And yet, I never went to college..

PS) Its not unusal to make $400/week doing the networking part time (1-2 days a week)

PSS)If you want, I can always give you a Job @ Firestorm Entertainment (My company)... We are Like Troma though, so don't count on making much money...

Edited by Landon D. Parks, 17 June 2005 - 08:15 PM.

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#7 soad0488

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 08:17 PM

Lol, thanks, and i wish there was a way to get rid of some of that cross threading i did, but its my first post (well posts) and i wont do it again! :ph34r:
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#8 Brian Wells

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 08:51 PM

I'll be 22 later this year (which makes me think I'm cooler than saying I'm 21) and I'm looking for a career in film myself. Made my first (and only) award winning documentary around seven years ago and have been learning the craft through independent study and internships ever since then.

I've shot plenty of videotape myself and for-hire, worked as an editor on various formats, as a location sound mixer for several independent features, day played on a CMT-network reality series, and interned/assisted/clapper/pa'd on more S16mm shoots than I care to remember and in the end of it, I don't consider my collected experience "a career" in film. That's why I put "student" down on this website.

I've had some exposure to the business and a few brushins with so-called "famous" people, but a career is a lifetime of achievements built one agonizing step at a time. If what I do is a "career" then it's pretty pathetic.

I'll consider my work a career when I'm more focused and strictly do one thing for a living... meaning I don't work a second job. Or, if I'm not working at all, which is arguably better for the ego (I only "work" as a cinematographer and not a Camera Store or MacDonalds even though I only "work" part time which is nine days a year) but does little to help further your continued existence here on earth.

Remember this: No matter what career you pursue, you must feed yourself!!
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#9 soad0488

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 09:25 PM

LOL! :ph34r:
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#10 drew_town

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 09:41 PM

Filmmaking requires a certain level of maturity and dedication. Seeing as how you can't take your studies seriously, I don't see how you expect to take on a filmmaking endeavor. Here's hoping you never work on a film titled P-E-R-M-A-N-E-N-T. That spelling class might come in handy after all.
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#11 David Sweetman

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Posted 17 June 2005 - 10:29 PM

I'm 17 too, been making movies for 4 years. What you need to do is make as many movies as you can as fast as possible. You'll be working on video, not film. Don't get into film until you know what you're doing. As for getting onto sets, it'd probably only help you insofar as it would inspire you. Without researching the equipment you wouldn't really know the right questions to ask, like why the dp rates the film at this ASA, why he sets for this f/stop, etc. You'd learn a lot more by making your own movies, by teaching yourself the aesthetic nuances of composing a shot on the frame, lighting your shot, directing your actors and cuting the final scene together.

Pick up a MiniDV camera and the student edition of AVID Xpress Pro - $295 at www.journeyed.com ($1500 retail)

David Sweetman

PS - you ought to tighten up your words
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#12 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 06:58 AM

Personally I'd just use windows movie maker for now. I mean, that does the basics. Before you go spending any big bucks on editing software, that *most* people seem to download anyway.
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#13 Brian Wells

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 07:43 AM

Only neds download software, Daniel. :unsure:
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#14 David Sweetman

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 01:28 PM

$295 isn't really 'big' bucks...

heck I was cutting on-camera for a year before I got avid.

I think it's best to learn on something that is actually used in the industry. If you can, you ought to learn Avid and final cut pro. And this guy sounds like a nerd so he'd probably be able to handle Avid; it's not too complicated.
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#15 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 05:04 PM

Sony Vegas has a 30 - day almost fully featured trail version you can download... the only limit is your license will expire in 30 days (just uninstall and reinstall it again, be sure to sign up for a new license under a different e-mail address each time) and that some file formats cannot be saved, the ones that require 3rd party software downloads...

but hey, it works almost as good as a fully functioning software, and it's free*

*=If your a cheater like me, or you can be a good boy and pay $600 for it :ph34r: :o :blink: :angry: (I dont think so!!!!!!!!!!!)

Edited by Landon D. Parks, 18 June 2005 - 05:04 PM.

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#16 Filip Plesha

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 06:18 PM

Well someone has to pay for it. So who do you expect that to be?

If you consider everyone that pays a moron, then it means you don't approve such action (buying software) and where does that leave you? It leaves you without any software becuase nobody is going to manufacture software if nobody is buying it and everyone is following your model of behaviour

I'm not going to moralize here, i'm just talking about consistancy (either you are for it or against it, the rest is double standards)

Edited by Filip Plesha, 18 June 2005 - 06:19 PM.

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#17 Mike Lary

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 08:46 PM

There is some free NLE software out there. Avid has a product they call FreeDV. You can download it here: http://avid.com/freedv/index.asp
It has some limitations, but you're getting more than you paid for since it's free. :)
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#18 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 08:34 AM

Well someone has to pay for it. So who do you expect that to be?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The people who are going to use it properly, the people who are going to make something out of it. I on the other hand, just wanted a good bit of software to play around with and to learn about. If I suddenly started making big films or something I'd go and buy a full version without a doubt.

You have to make these pieces of software pay for themselves, right now I can't, but I can learn about them.
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#19 Brian Wells

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 09:06 AM

I on the other hand, just wanted a good bit of software to play around with and to learn about.

That's why Avid knocks 80% off the commercial prices for students.
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#20 Brian Wells

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 09:14 AM

fully featured trail version you can download... be sure to sign up for a new license under a different e-mail address each time... it works almost as good as a fully functioning software, and it's free*


Landon,
There is nothing wrong or inethical about what you're doing as long as you are indeed obtaining an authentic trial version from Sony each month and re-installing it. That is completely OK in my book. If you use a key or crack program, then that's illegal, obviously, but from what you say, you're just using a different email account each time you download and that is perfectly acceptable. I hope you're enjoying it. Even with the reduced functionality, it's still a great tool. Enjoy!
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