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Is this chiaroscuro?


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#1 David Edward Keen

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 01:33 AM

Can the lighting in this pic be referred to as chiaroscuro?

 

Is the bright part bright enough? Am I grasping the concept of chiaroscuro?


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 02:06 AM

Why duplicate posts and neither with a link to the picture?
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#3 David Edward Keen

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 02:08 AM

I tried to post the picture twice but it didnt work
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:10 AM

To post a picture within the post, it has to be a jpeg hosted on another site, and then you bracket the full url address with "img" in brackets at the front and "/img" in brackets at the end. Or you can just post the url and let the reader click on it.


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#5 David Edward Keen

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 10:16 AM

Ah ok i guess the easiest way is

https://m.facebook.c...1?ref=bookmarks

My profile picture, with the orange umbrella.
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#6 Mark Dunn

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 11:15 AM

No.


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#7 David Edward Keen

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 11:51 AM

How isn't it? Im actually looking for an understanding of what is considered chiaroscuro in art
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 12:39 PM

I suppose it vaguely could be considered chiaroscuro but generally the point is to use strong contrast in lighting to create a three-dimensional effect where the subject pops out in relief often against a darker background. In this case, if the subject is your face, it does not have a strong three-dimensional effect due to the light bringing you forward of the background, instead you sort of recede and there is sort of a flatness.  But it does have a pervading feeling of darkness, just not a dark background, so it is semi-chiaroscuro.


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#9 David Edward Keen

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 12:46 PM

Ah ok...thanks that clears up my misconceptions!
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#10 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 02:31 PM

I don't have Facebook, so I couldn't see your picture.  But here is a good example of chiaroscuro:

 

 

Mother & Son.jpg


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#11 David Edward Keen

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:44 PM

👍 ive been digging lotsa paintings too thanks!
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#12 Mark Dunn

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 04:51 AM

Try A Philosopher Giving that Lecture on an Orrery, in which a Lamp is put in the Place of the Sun, or The Blacksmith's Shop, by Joseph Wright of Derby.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 03 January 2017 - 04:53 AM.

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#13 John E Clark

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 12:38 PM

How isn't it? Im actually looking for an understanding of what is considered chiaroscuro in art

 

Chiaroscuro is 'light/shadow' or 'light/dark' and is used to create a 3-d effect, beyond simple perspective, as well as adding 'drama'. Your referenced image appears to be more of a silhouette than an example of chiaroscuro.

 

In the early modern era, painters developed 3-d perspective drawing, but in general the 'light' was often 'flat', without much contrast.

 

By the mid 1500s, for portraits, one finds heavier use of shadow to give a 3-d effect, when the portrait would not otherwise have significant 'perspective' to cue the 3-d effect.

 

For example, ca 1480s Memling Portrait

 

7793b7c31cf8cf11fa3daf704cdc6b37.jpg

 

 

About 100 years later a Bronzino portrait ca. 1541

 

Renaissance-women-portraits-paintings-of

 

And another 100 years... 1660 Rembrandt

 

Rembrandt-001.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format


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#14 David Edward Keen

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 06:49 AM

Thanks for the info!
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