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Working out gel / kelvin combinations


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#1 Jonathan O'Neill

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 05:56 AM

Hi,

 

I'm looking for a similar look to this attached image.

 

Does anyone have a good way to work out what the combination of gels and in camera kelvin which are needed to achieve the warm lamp light vs the cooler green backlight?

 

i.e. an app which you can input the RGB picker info, and it will give you a corresponding LEE filter combination?

 

Alternatively, do you know what the in camera kelvin is likely to be, the kelvin for the lamp light, and what the kelvin and gel for the backlight is likely to be?

 

Cheers

Jon

Attached Images

  • vlcsnap-2009-09-20-17h03m28s20.jpg

Edited by Jonathan O'Neill, 19 January 2017 - 05:58 AM.

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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 07:57 AM

There has been no colour management between the scan and the image you find on the web, so the colour picker idea is a non-starter.

"Casino Royale" was shot on 35mm. so there's no "in-camera kelvin". It was more than likely shot on daylight-balanced stock to match HMI lighting. I don't think the lamp is a practical- it might even have been a photoflood or similar tungsten fitting. If I'm right about the HMI, the light on Bond has been gelled orange and the background light gelled blue to take it above daylight balance as it looks a little cold. There may be a little green as well, it's hard to tell on my monitor.


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#3 Michael Sanders

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:48 PM

P-cam on an iPhone allows you to work out mired colour shifts, but those colour shifts might not render as you want on camera to the green you want.

 

It could be an FX gel like 219 or 242 (Tungsten to Florescent) and probably timed a bit more in the DI. 


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#4 Mark Kenfield

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:14 PM

The silvery blue moonlight in the background looks like tungsten with half CTB to me, and the key light looks like dimmed tungsten (or tungsten with added CTO for warmth (to match the dimmed practicals on the walls).

I'd assume it was shot on 500T (tungsten) stock.
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