Jump to content


Photo

Film ISO for Day Exterior/Interior


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Austin Pink

Austin Pink

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 28 February 2017 - 09:30 PM

Hi guys, so I have a short shoot on 16mm coming up. I'l be doing mostly day exteriors in open, desert-like locations with a few car interiors and daylight interiors with decent window coverage. I figured I would do 50d for the daylight exterior so I don't have too much grain / have to fuss with lots of ND. Is 50d too slow? As for the car/daylight interiors, should I get a 250d or something more like 200/500T. All my light will be available light and mostly sunlight. So can 250d perform daylight indoors or is a 500t better for flexibility? Let me know what you think. Thanks


Edited by Austin Pink, 28 February 2017 - 09:34 PM.

  • 0


#2 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3510 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 February 2017 - 11:11 PM

50D is perfect for bright day exteriors. Get a set of ND filters (0.3, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2), or you will be shooting at T16 in direct sun.

You can also overexpose the film stock by around a stop for even less grain, if you like. The easiest way to do this consistently is to set your light meter to 25ASA instead of 50ASA.

With car day interiors, you should be fine with 50D as well. Without additional HMI lighting and a process trailer, you'll likely have to split the exposure between the exterior and interior of the car. 50D has so much overexposure latitude that there will still be plenty of detail outside. A polarizer will be helpful to have in this situation.

You may want the 250D stock for your day interiors unless all of your scenes take place right next to large windows. If you plan to use incandescent practicals or tungsten lamps inside, then you may want to consider the 500T. Then your windows will go very blue though. Fast lenses will help a lot for available light interiors.

250D stock would also be good if you plan to extend shooting into dawn/dusk, or if the weather turns and gets dark outside. This would be more likely to be an issue if you were shooting in the woods, rather than in open desert though.
  • 3

#3 Mark Kenfield

Mark Kenfield
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1018 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia/Wherever The Wind Takes Me

Posted 01 March 2017 - 08:55 AM

Sat's basically already said everything I would. I just went through something very similar myself. I opted to shoot the whole project on 250D because we had a seriously tight shooting ratio (a little over 4:1) and I didn't want to risk any wastage swapping stocks, or getting to our interiors with 50D left over.

 

In hindsight, I would absolutely go for 50D for the daylight exteriors/car interiors in future - I didn't have the troubles I thought I would with needing the faster stock for daytime car interiors, and the amount of ND I had in front of the lens (up to 6 and 7 stops) in order to keep the aperture where I wanted it, made seeing through the viewfinder pretty tough.

 

The 250D worked a treat for interiors though, I was shooting at T/2 and still had to keep a stop or two of ND in front of the lens to get that.


  • 2

#4 Austin Pink

Austin Pink

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 01 March 2017 - 02:23 PM

Thanks for all the detailed responses. Yeah I've decided to go with mostly 50d and some 250d for the day interiors. I'll be sure to being plenty of ND's and a polarizer too. Thanks again!


  • 0

#5 Karim D. Ghantous

Karim D. Ghantous
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 02 March 2017 - 11:53 PM

If your camera has a video tap, would that solve the issue of using NDs? If that's the case, maybe it makes sense to shoot one stock, such as 7207, as Mark did. It would keep things somewhat simpler.


  • 0

#6 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1668 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 03 March 2017 - 01:23 PM

How would the tap figure into using NDs?
  • 0

#7 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7075 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 03 March 2017 - 01:36 PM

Any tap on a camera will be effected by NDs as well since they just split the image going to the viewfinder. You may find with NDs in the camera deep you may want to go with an 80/20 split if you can (80% to vf and 20% to tap) just so you can more easily see through the optical finder.

All taps on 16mm cameras are going to be SD anyway and of limited quality-- really only good for framing.


  • 0

#8 Karim D. Ghantous

Karim D. Ghantous
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 03 March 2017 - 05:43 PM

Is it not possible to amplify the signal? It will be noisy but at least you can see what you're doing. If there are no HD video taps, I would find that surprising.


  • 0

#9 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7075 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 03 March 2017 - 05:46 PM

To a degree, but it gets useless prettyfast. It was even an issue on 500T when working in low light. And as far as I know there are no HD taps for S16mm. There is 1 for 35mm, from Arri the IVS system, but even that was a rarety to see/use. No one needed HD in those days, and it was expensive, large, and power hungry comparatively.

With the ascent of D-Cinema cameras there  has been little need to do the RnD to put an HD tap into a film camera. And while the IVS was/is a great system, it offers little over an SD tap since on film you NEVER pull from the monitor anyway as it's not as trustworth.

Framing and continuity were the only uses for taps. Sometimes too you would run it into a deck to get on-site playback, but again, only for reference.


  • 0


Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Abel Cine

CineLab

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

CineTape

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

The Slider

CineLab