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Transferring HDV to 35mm


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#1 Micah Fernandez

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 09:27 PM

And what are important pitfalls to watch out for? Thanks to all who help :)
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 10:52 PM

And what are important pitfalls to watch out for? Thanks to all who help :)

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What format did you shoot? (50i/1080, 60i/1080, etc.) What camera are you using? Have you already shot the movie?
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#3 Micah Fernandez

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 12:58 AM

An FX1 will be used, for a commercial that is to be shown in a movie theater. I'm not certain what format as I won't be calling the shots. Will it matter drastically?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:26 AM

An FX1 will be used, for a commercial that is to be shown in a movie theater. I'm not certain what format as I won't be calling the shots. Will it matter drastically?

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You can transfer anything to film; it just depends on what level of motion artifacts you can live with. The FX1 only does 60i/1080; it doesn't have a 50i option like the ZU1.

For a film transfer from HDV, shooting in 50i makes the most sense, so it can be converted to 25P and then transferred 1:1 to 35mm for 24 fps projection (so an audio adjustment will be necessary.)

For transferring 60i/1080 to film, it's similar to transferring NTSC (60i/480) to film. 60 fields has to be converted to 24 frames.

Don't use the CineFrame modes for a film transfer.

Besides the non-film 60i look you're going to get, the other problem with HDV is the high compression level and low color information, which will make artifact-free color-correction in post difficult, so try and get it close to the correct look in camera when shooting.
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#5 Micah Fernandez

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 10:53 AM

Thanks for the useful tips David. It's great to have someone as generous as you in this community.

Another question: what about an XL2? What are the characteristics of its image quality vis-a-vis the FX1's when blown up to 35 mm?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:01 AM

You'd get the 24P motion rendition with the XL2 but a lot more resolution with the FX1.

Why not use a pro 24P/480 camera like the SDX900? 2/3" CCD's, DVCPRO-50 4:2:2, professional lenses?
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#7 Micah Fernandez

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:10 AM

I did bring that up. However these two cameras are the only ones immediately available. The concept isn't final yet, so I'm doing as much research as I can. I take it then the XL2 would be less appropriate for a sleek, glossy look like say, a Mercedes Benz ad?
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:15 AM

I did bring that up. However these two cameras are the only ones immediately available. The concept isn't final yet, so I'm doing as much research as I can. I take it then the XL2 would be less appropriate for a sleek, glossy look like say, a Mercedes Benz ad?

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Neither an XL2 or FX1 is appropriate for a sleek ad. Car ads are shot in 35mm; the next choice would be Super-16 or pro 24P HD. Next choice would be pro 24P SD.

Somewhere below those would be a consumer camera like the XL2 or FX1. But probably the FX1 would look "slicker" than the XL2. But why mess with these cheap consumer cameras for a car commercial??? You could rent an F900 for the weekend for less than the costs of a complete DV or HDV package.
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#9 Chris Burke

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:23 AM

I did bring that up. However these two cameras are the only ones immediately available. The concept isn't final yet, so I'm doing as much research as I can. I take it then the XL2 would be less appropriate for a sleek, glossy look like say, a Mercedes Benz ad?

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If this is a Mercedes add, why are you shooting on HDV and not 35mm? In any case, all the HDV cameras out there are 1/3 inch chip. the XL2 with a 35mm PS tecknik adapter and cine primes will give you a great look, the SDX 900 or Vari Cam for that matter will give you a much better, "sleeker" look. Little cameras with little chips and lenses, give a softer, low res look, akin to video. If this is desired, go for it, if not, push for a better format, even Super 16.


chris
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#10 Kai.w

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 01:50 PM

You can transfer anything to film; it just depends on what level of motion artifacts you can live with. The FX1 only does 60i/1080; it doesn't have a 50i option like the ZU1.

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Not to be pedantic (sp?) but I guess you referred to the NTSC version... The pal version does of course do 50i but lacks the 60i option, which is probably what you meant....

-k
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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 07:02 PM

The PAL version is called the FX1E. The NTSC version is called the FX1. The Z1U does both 50i & 60i.

There is some good info here:

http://www.sonyhdvinfo.com/
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#12 Micah Fernandez

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 07:21 PM

If this is a Mercedes add, why are you shooting on HDV and not 35mm? In any case, all the HDV cameras out there are 1/3 inch chip. the XL2 with a 35mm PS tecknik adapter and cine primes will give you a great look, the SDX 900 or Vari Cam for that matter will give you a much better, "sleeker" look. Little cameras with little chips and lenses, give a softer, low res look, akin to video. If this is desired, go for it, if not, push for a better format, even Super 16.
chris

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It actually isn't a Mercedes ad. The concept isn't even final yet so I am trying to get my bearings concerning what blown up DV/HDV can or cannot do, so obviously most of these questions are trite and insufferable ;) 35mm is out of the question for the budget allocated, and 16mm is extremely problematic to process in my country.
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#13 Chris Burke

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 12:12 AM

It actually isn't a Mercedes ad. The concept isn't even final yet so I am trying to get my bearings concerning what blown up DV/HDV can or cannot do, so obviously most of these questions are trite and insufferable ;) 35mm is out of the question for the budget allocated, and 16mm is extremely problematic to process in my country.

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you may find the blow up to 35mm to be quite expensive as well. Perhaps a digital projector is in your future. Check out bonolabs.com they have some great Super 16 to hard drive packages. Good luck
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#14 Kai.w

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 02:46 PM

The PAL version is called the FX1E.  The NTSC version is called the FX1. The Z1U does both 50i & 60i.

There is some good info here:

http://www.sonyhdvinfo.com/

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Never noticed the "E" :rolleyes:

Thanks for clearing this up.

-k
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