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Shooting 35mm B&W - Kodak Eastman Double-X 5222 Negative and black skin


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#1 Mhairi-Clare Fitzpatrick

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 02:11 PM

Hey everyone,

 

I'm working on a project and was wondering if anyone had any experience and advice to offer on this..

 

I'm shooting 2 x moving portraits of an African American model on 35mm B&W Kodak Eastman Double-X Negative 5222. Both shots will be locked down on sticks and with no movement (other than the subject blinking and breathing). One shot will be in a studio with lighting and the other shot may be day exterior. We will be shooting 24 fps and with no fancy speed changes/reverse etc.

This is my first time shooting on 35mm and its been a while since i shot on 16mm so ive had to do a lot of research over the past few weeks which has been exciting learning.

 

The subject has tattoos on her upper arms. Its quite important that we capture the tattoos (black ink writing).

 

I'm wondering if anyone has any advice on this particular film stock in relation to capturing those kinds of details on darker skin / how best to light and expose for these details? Are there other factors that i havent considered which impact this? Generally any advice on this film stock would be great as this is my first time shooting on it. 

 

Let me know if i should post this on the lighting thread as well..

 

Thank you!!


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#2 James Compton

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 06:49 PM

 Use a Medium-Orange filter on the lens. That filter works well in accentuating African skin tones on B&W film stocks.

Red filters are too heavy and Yellow filters doesn't dial it in as well as Medium Orange. Light the foreground/talent with Kino Flo's or fluorescent tubes. The sheen of African skin radiates in nice ways with fluorescent lighting. Bring along a DSLR to check the lighting results. Use it only as a point of reference, the images exposed on film will look much better.


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#3 Mhairi-Clare Fitzpatrick

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 08:51 AM

Hey James,

 

Cool, thanks for the advice! I will have a go on our test shoot. Do you by chance have any references or things you shot where i can see the aesthetic before? 


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#4 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 02:33 AM

I would also suggest moisturizing the subjects skin before shooting. Baby oil might give too pronounced of a sheen but something as simple as a bit of lotion will catch your light and pop the detail a bit.

Edited by Kenny N Suleimanagich, 12 April 2017 - 02:34 AM.

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