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How to add Depth and Dimension in the frame

blocking lighting

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#1 Carlos Herrera

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 01:52 PM

Hi everyone!

 

I'm going to be making a movie with my friends soon (Horror/Comedy). This may be a broad question, but here it is.

 

In your opinion, what Cinematography techniques add dimension and depth in an image?

 

With this movie, I am hoping to immerse the audience by creating a visually immersive and interesting "mise en scène".

 

I have been leaning towards good blocking, but I would love to hear how you all feel this is accomplished.

 

Thank you!

 

 


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 02:37 PM

Obviously having deeper backgrounds can help, as opposed to staging things against a flat, blank wall...

Framing dark against bright against dark, etc. creates a feeling of depth. There is a notion that bright areas advance, dark areas recede (though this is not a hard and fast rule) so having faces against a darker background tends to make them stand out more.
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#3 Carlos Herrera

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 03:01 PM

Obviously having deeper backgrounds can help, as opposed to staging things against a flat, blank wall...

Framing dark against bright against dark, etc. creates a feeling of depth. There is a notion that bright areas advance, dark areas recede (though this is not a hard and fast rule) so having faces against a darker background tends to make them stand out more.

 

Thank you for your suggestions Mr.Mullen!

 

I will practice some compositions with your advice in mind.


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#4 AJ Young

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 01:30 PM

Lens choice is another factor to consider. Wider lenses give a better sense of space when the subjects move forward and back from the camera as opposed to longer lenses that feel images feel compressed.

 

I recommend getting this book: The Visual Story by Bruce Block. LINK


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#5 Carlos Herrera

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 04:16 PM

Lens choice is another factor to consider. Wider lenses give a better sense of space when the subjects move forward and back from the camera as opposed to longer lenses that feel images feel compressed.

 

Thanks for the tip! I'll try some experimenting with wide angle lenses per your advice!


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#6 Timothy Sewell

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 07:54 AM

Haze can add depth.


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#7 Carlos Herrera

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:41 AM

Haze can add depth.

 

Other than fog machines, how can you create haze?


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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 12:29 PM

Haze machines... there really isn't a substitute for haze other than steam, but tends to work better in a jungle set, not an interior (unless a steam room) but then you have to deal with your lenses fogging up.

Anything else that hangs in the air is probably not safe to breathe for very long.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 12:31 PM

Haze can sometimes have the opposite effect of adding depth, it can flatten the image by washing out the background.
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#10 Carlos Herrera

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 01:16 PM

Haze machines... there really isn't a substitute for haze other than steam, but tends to work better in a jungle set, not an interior (unless a steam room) but then you have to deal with your lenses fogging up.

Anything else that hangs in the air is probably not safe to breathe for very long.

 

Haze can sometimes have the opposite effect of adding depth, it can flatten the image by washing out the background.

 

Thank you for your insights Mr.Mullen, the use of haze makes more sense to me now. I'll do some additional research as well.


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Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

CineLab

Tai Audio

Pro 8mm

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

ZoomCrane

The Slider

Glidecam

Technodolly